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BARBOUR'S raze 

NEEDLEWORK SERIES 




COPYRlGHTEC 



ATreatise on LACE MAKING 
EMBROIDERYandNEEDLEWORK 

with &s>~ *£SX*+* 

IRISH FLAX THREADS *** 

Published by THE BARBOUR gr.S r .'U?. 0,ton 
BROTHERS COMPANY* ggs»" 

-Price Ten Cents*' ianfrVncisco 1897 



NuAberSk 



HIGHEST AWARDS - WORLD'S FAIR 
ESTABLISHED 1784. 



7893. 



Gold Medal Threads are the Best, ^jjj Read the Record of Highest Awards. 



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waryAnniem. 
(Decorati\/ecArt 
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STE1UJ N G 
AND FRANC1NE 

C1A1UC 
ART INSTITUTE 
L1BRART 




BARBOUR'S THREADS 



HAVE STOOD THE 
TEST FOR MORE THAN 



A CENTURY. 



THREAD WORKS! 
PATERSON, NEW JERSEY. LISBURN, IRELAND. OTTENSEN, GERMANY. 



stores: 

New York, 218 Church St. Boston, 58 South St. 

Chicago, 108 & 110 Franklin St. St. Louis, 814 Lucas Ave. 

Philadelphia, 410 Arch St. Cincinnati, 118 East 6th St. 

San Francisco, 517 & 519 Market St. 

Also in London, Manchester, Glasgow, Dublin, Paris, Hamburg, Montreal, Melbourne, 
Sydney, Brussels, Amsterdam, Madrid, Milan and Naples. 

Forming collectively a Flax Thread industry employing jooo persons or as large as any 

two other Linen Thread firms. 

ASK FOR BARBOUR'S. INSIST UPON HAVING IT. SOLD EVERYWHERE. 




Barbour's Prize Needle-Work, Series No. 6. 



Table-Cover in Cross-Stitch Embroidery. 

MATERIALS:— Barbour's Ulster Rope Linen Floss,4skeins 
each of shade No. 2, No. 5, No. 20 and No. 122, and 
2 skeins No. 43, with a square of Berlin canvas of 
basket-cloth 27x27 inches, 

HAT "there is nothing new under the sun " seems 
as true in the domain of needlework as elsewhere. 
This is illustrated by the fact that the familiar 
cross-stitch has been recently revived, and is 
again enjoying a favor which is likely to continue. One of 
the simplest of embroidery stitches, it is also one of the oldest, 
since we have the evidence of history, attested by well- 
preserved specimens of the work itself, that it was in common 
use among the ancient Egyptians, Phrygians and Hebrews. 
Several important revivals of this style have been chronicled, 
one in the nth century, noted for the production of some 
famous tapestries, and another in the i6th century, when 
cross-stitch was used in ecclesiastical embroidery almost ex- 
clusively. Still another occurred in the early part of the 
present century, when the colored patterns, first published in 
Berlin, gave it the name of "Berlin work," and doubtless the 
fact that wool was used to a large extent in the embroidery 
offers a reason for its decline in popularity. It is again in 
favor, however, and never more so. Ladies who may not 
have the knowledge of art embroidery nor the time necessary 
for creditable work, are able to produce many useful and 
beautiful articles for household use in cross-stitch which are 
artistic in every sense. Colors may be chosen to harmonize 
with the furnishing of one's rooms, and there is a great 
fascination in watching the pattern grow beneath the hands, 
brought out in all the lustrous richness of the Ulster floss. 
Cotton should never be used for the work, as it is dull 
always, and soon grows dingy ; it is disappointing in every 
way. Worsted invites moths, and is unsuitable for other 
reasons which need not be given. Silk is expensive, and 
wears rough, and it remains for linen to prove itself equal to 
the occasion. The Ulster rope linen floss comes in a great 
variety of beautiful shades, works and wears smooth, and has 
all the lustre of silk. 



Barbour's Prize Needle-Work, Series No. 6. 







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TABLE COVER IN CROSS-STITCH EMBROIDERY. 



See 

That all 




your 


*^((-» [flax! )/£ 


Linen 


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Thread 


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carries 


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this Trade-Mark. 



BOOK NO. 6. 



BARBOUR'S 



PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



A TREATISE 



LACE-MAKING AND EMBROIDERY 



ig8 






THE BARBO! 


WgMm imiXQf 


OMPANY 




PUBLISHED BY 
JR BROTHERS C 
1897. 



BOOKS No. i, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, and No. 5, 

ALSO 

BOOK OF INSTRUCTION IN MACRAME LACE-MAKING, 

AND THE NEW ILLUSTRATED HANDBOOK OF 

TORCHON (OR BOBBIN) LACE-WORK, 

will be sent to any address on receipt of ten cents each. In the 
Prize Needle-work Series no patterns are duplicated, and the whole 
form a compendium of the choicest designs. • 



If customers find difficulty in procuring Barbour's Irish Flax 
Threads and Flosses from their local stores, it will be sent from The 
Barbour Brothers Company, New York, postpaid, at prices below. 
We shall be pleased if our friends will kindly give, when writing, 
addresses of dealers to whom application for the threads has been 
made : 

3-cord, 200-yards spools, dark-blue, white, whited-brown 

(or ecru), and drabs, spool 10 cents. 

3-cord carpet thread, any color, skein . 3 cents. 

00 Ulster rope linen floss, 80 shades, skein 5 cents. 

No. 4 etching flax, any color, 80 shades, 2 skeins ... 5 cents. 

Color book, containing full line of shades 10 cents. 

White Star flossette, sizes *, * # , ***, and **•**, skein . . 5 cents. 
New Irish flax lace threads, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, No. 

120 and No. 150, spool 10 cents. 

New Ho niton lace thread, 2 -cord, 200-yards spools, No. 

250, very fine and strong, and serviceable also for the 

finest knitting, crocheting, and other lace-work, spool, 10 cents. 
Crochet thread, gray, ecru, and white : 

Nos. 16, 18, 20, and 25, ball 15 cents. 

Nos. 30, 35, 40, and 50, ball 20 cents. 

Nos. 60 and 70, ball 25 cents. 

Flax macrame, 4-ounce ball 25 cents. 

New Ulster (or Russian) braid, per yard, 5 cents ; 12 yards, 50 cents. 

Copyright, 1S97, p R£ ss of 

by Qatktotll an& Cburcfoill 

The Barbour Brothers Company. boston 



CONTENTS 



PUBLISHERS' NOTICE 



PAGE 
4 



LACE MAKING AND EM- 
BROIDERY : 

Shamrock Lace 7 

Octo Lace 9 

Clover Lace and Inser- 
tion 10 

Shell Point Lace .... 13 

Imogene Lace 14 

Russian or" Spoke " Stitch, 

in Crochet 15 

Table Square, with Border, 18 

Doily in Filagree Work . 20 

Centre-piece or Tidy . . 22 

Fancy Bag 24 

Infant's Bib 25 

Star Centre-piece .... 27 

Twine-Holder 29 

Drawn Lace, with Fringe . 30 

Heart Lace 32 

Serpentine Lace . . . . 35 

Diagonal Point Lace . . 36 

Knitted Star Doily ... 38 

Maltese Centre-piece . . 40 

Tatted Scarf End .... 43 

Netted Doily 45 

Wide Antique Lace ... 46 
Tidy in Filet Guipure . . 50 
Macrame Hand-bag ... 52 
Darned Net Lace and In- 
sertion 53 

Drawn-work Doilies . . . 55 

Round Tray-cover .... 56 



Scarf in Danish Antique 

Embroidery 5S 

Tea-cloth in Danish An- 
tique Embroidery ... 60 
Centre-piece, with Maltese 

Braid 61 

Chrysanthemum Centre- 
piece 63 

Sofa Pillow 65 

Centre-piece in Coronation 

Work 66 

Sofa Pillow in Cross-stitch, 67 
Russian Lace and Insertion, 68 
Cross-stitch Square ... 69 
Royal Battenburg Centre- 
piece 70 

Round Centre-piece ... 72 

Sofa Pillow 73 

Bolero Jacket, in Renais- 
sance Work 74 

Point Lace Handkerchiefs, 75 

Strawberry Centre-piece . 77 

Tea Cosy 79 

Handkerchief in Duchess 

Lace 81 

Scarf in Battenburg Lace . 82 
Huckabuck Sofa Pillow . 83 
Centre-piece in Batten- 
burg Lace 84 

Square with Battenburg 

Lace , . . 85 

Renaissance Lace . . . . 87 

Designs in Cross-stitch . 91 

EXPLANATION OF TERMS . 94 



Directions for washing Embroidery on page 97 




1734 t«BiFLAxijEM 1897 



Again to many friends in many lands, Greeting : 
The publishers, no less than the editor of the Prize Needle-work 
Series, especially appreciate this opportunity for a little personal 
talk with the ladies everywhere who use and recommend the Irish 
flax threads and flosses, as well as the books which suggest the supe- 
riority of these standard products for every variety of lace-work and 
embroidery. Kind words and pleasant letters come from all sides. 
One lady writes : " No. 5 is a perfect gem ; and, while waiting 
impatiently for the next issue, I do not see how this can be improved 
upon." Another : " The books are all so good I cannot say which 
is best, as I told a friend who asked me not long ago. There is 
something in each which seems to be just what one wants." This is 
exactly the secret — the Prize Needle-work Series differ in variety of 
contents ; and with the abundant incentive to continued effort given 
by appreciative patrons, it would be strange indeed if No. 6 should 
not take its own place at the head of the list, containing as it does 
the year's quota of new and practical designs and ideas, all richly 
illustrated. 

Reference being made to new work, we wish to call particular 
attention to the eminent suitability of the Ulster rope linen floss and 
etching flax for cross-stitch embroidery. One trial is all that is 
needed to insure its continued use. Smooth, lustrous, flexible, it is 
a delight to work with it. Cross-stitch embroidery, newly revived, 

W 



publishers' notice. 



was never more popular than at present, and one is no longer con- 
fined to a checked material, as patterns may be had stamped on 
denim, felt, etc., showing just where to place each stitch and doing 
away with counting. The applications of this work are unlimited, 
and by the aid of checked paper one may easily originate patterns 
for any purpose. Even where the design is provided, however, it 
will be found that its effectiveness in great measure lies in the color- 
ing; and by selecting from a shade-book of the Ulster rope linen, 
which is mailed for ten cents, the most charming combinations may 
be made. 

That this is the age of linen is strongly indicated. Table decora- 
tions, doilies, centre-pieces, etc., are showing less and less of the 
fine " filo " embroidery in color, which requires so much time and 
patience to accomplish, and is often ruined by the first laundering. 
Even the small doilies sold for " filo " embroidery have edges but- 
tonholed with Irish flax floss. Lace and white linen embroideries, 
which may be easily cleansed and lose none of their beauty, are 
chosen for table use, and the demand is, further, in household 
decoration, for articles that may be quickly and easily produced, 
giving the best effect for the least expenditure of time. 

We are always glad of suggestions. Requests for specified pat- 
terns will receive attention, if their publication would seem to serve 
general interest. We want ladies to feel that the Prize Needle- work 
Series belongs to them, and to take a pride in helping to make the 
books all that can be desired. Many suggestions received during 
the past year are of practical value. 

In this connection, we invite ladies who contemplate exhibiting 
articles of embroidery or lace -work at town, county, or State fairs, 
or in similar expositions, to write us. We wonder, too, whether it 
has occurred to all that no more pleasing gift could be made a friend 
who is fond of needle-work than a copy of the Prize Series. Many 
ladies, when sending, include an order for an extra copy or copies 
to be mailed as suggested. The price is low, certainly, but the 
books are so beautifully illustrated and printed, so artistic in every 
way, that they seem especially suited for remembrances on any 
occasion. We shall also appreciate the favor, if, when writing, 



barbour's prize needle-work series. 



ladies will inclose addresses of friends interested in needle-work to 
whom the announcement of new books may be mailed. 

A slight error crept into the directions for the beautiful lace con- 
tributed by Mrs. Mary E. Bates, — page 23, No. 5, — so slight that it 
was difficult to discover it. In the 4th row the parenthesis should be 
placed after k 2, at beginning, to include the first " n" in the repe- 
tition. As has been suggested, no hesitancy need be felt by any 
purchaser of the Prize Needle-work Series in writing to either editor 
or contributors, should there be any difficulty in working from direc- 
tions given. For such information, however, a stamp should be 
inclosed. 

Detailed instructions for sending work have been given in pre- 
vious books. Suffice it to say that we are always glad to examine 
work done with Barbour's Irish flax threads and flosses, and such 
articles as are deemed suitable for publication are purchased at 
liberal rates. Directions, uniform in the matter of terms, etc., 
with those published, must be carefully written out, the price plainly 
marked upon each article, and charges prepaid by the sender. 
Payment will be made upon acceptance, or, if not accepted, the 
article will be returned, transportation paid. We will endeavor to 
make sale of work, nicely done and always with Barbour's threads, 
if desired. Kindly state, when sending articles, exactly how much 
material is required, how much thread for a yard of lace, etc. A 
price-list of working-patterns, etc., used in the Prize Needle-work 
Series, has been prepared, and will be sent any lady desiring it, 
together with a table of contents for the entire series. 

MARY E. BRADFORD. 



All communications should be addressed, 

THE BARBOUR BROTHERS COMPANY, 

Needle-work Department, 

218 Church St., 

New York. 



LACE MAKING AND EMBROIDERY. 



SHAMROCK LACE. 

[Contributed by Miss Nellie Ferguson, Springvale, Maine.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 60, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel hook, size o. Three and one-half spools are re- 
quired for a yard of lace. 

This pattern, although elaborate in appearance, is quite simple in 
construction. It is composed of shamrock-leaf forms and small 
wheels, made separately and joined to form the design illustrated. 

Shamrock leaf: 1st leaflet — 1. Ch 16, 1 dtc in 9th st from 
hook, ch 2, miss 2, dtc in 12th st, ch 3, miss 3, sc in last st. 2. Over 
ch of 1st space, 5 dc, picot (made by ch 3, 1 sc in last dc), * 3 
dc, picot in 2d space, 3 dc, picot, 3 dc, picot in end space, (3 dc, 
picot,) 6 times, next space, 3 dc, picot, 3 dc, picot, last space 3 
dc, picot, * 5 dc, join with sc. 

2d leaflet — 1. Ch 19, dtc in 9th st, ch 2, miss 2, dtc in next, 
ch 2, miss 2, dtc in next, ch 3, miss 3, sc in last st. 2. Over ch 
of 1st space, 5 dc, join to picot marked * in first leaflet, 3 dc, picot, 
fill side and end spaces as before, over last space, 3 dc, picot, * 5 
dc, join with sc bet 1st and 2d leaflet. 

3d leaflet — 1. Like 1st row of 1st leaflet. 2. Over ch in 1st 
space, 5 dc, join to picot marked * in 2d leaflet, then repeat from 
1 st * in 2d row of 1st leaflet to the picot * in same row, join to 
this picot, 5 dc, join with 1 sc bet 2d and 3d leaflet, fasten thread 
neatly, on wrong side of work, and cut off. This completes one 
leaf, and all are alike except that at point of each scallop, each 
leaflet of this being made like the 2d leaflet in directions. 

Wheel : Ch 9, join ; over this ring work * 2 dc, 1 picot, repeat 
from * until there are 10 picots with 2 dc bet, join and fasten off. 
If preferred, leaves and wheels may be joined in working. I like 



8 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



best to place them in position, when completed, and join with 
needle and thread. 

For the heading : Make a sufficient number of wheels for length 
desired, joining as worked so there will be 3 free picots above and 
3 below side joinings. The lower picots are joined to the lace, and 
a heading crocheted along the upper picots thus : 




Shamrock Lace. 



i. * i tc in i st picot, ch 2, tc in next picot, ch 2, tc in 3d picot, 
ch 2, and repeat. 

2. 3 dc over each 2 ch bet tc. 

3. 1 tc, * ch 2, miss 2, tc in next, repeat from * to end. 

4. Like 2d row. 

After desired length of lace is made, and heading finished, an 
edge is crocheted around the points. Fasten to lower wheel in 
cluster of 7, bet points, ch 5, miss 2 picots, fasten in next, * ch 5, 



OCTO LACE. b) 

miss 2 picots, fasten in next, ch 5, fasten (always with 1 sc) in 
next, ch 5, miss 1, fasten, ch 5, fasten in next, ch 5, miss 2, fasten 
in next, chain 5, fasten in next, repeat from *, ch 5, miss 2, fasten 
in next, ch 5, fasten in next, ch 5, fasten in next, ch 5, 
fasten in next (around point), and work up on other side like 1st. 
2. Fasten thread at starting-point of last row, 2 dc, picot, 2 dc 
over 5 ch, sc in sc, * 2 dc, picot, 2 dc, picot, 2 dc over next ch, 
sc in sc, 3 dc, picot, 3 dc over next ch, sc in sc, repeat from * to 
5 ch at end of point, 2 dc, picot, 3 dc, picot, 3 dc, picot, 2 dc, 
sc in sc. 

This lace will well repay the effort necessary to produce it. For 
a bureau scarf, or similar purpose, it is particularly handsome. The 
figures may be combined in a great variety of ways, to make col- 
lars, plastrons, etc., and the effect is very rich. 



OCTO LACE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. A. L. Wertman, Tannersville, Pa.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, 
No. 50, and steel hook, size 1. 

The twin daisies which form the figure 8 are worked without cut- 
ting thread. Wind thread around forefinger 10 times, on this ring 
work 30 dc, join. Ch 6, and make 15 roll sts (o 15 times) in 15 
dc, wind another ring, tight to the last roll, 30 dc in ring, join ; ch 
6, fasten back over last 3 rolls made, then a roll st in each dc on last 
ring, fastening to bottom of last roll st in 1st daisy. Ch 6, fasten 
back over last 3 rolls made, then a roll st in each dc of 1st daisy, 
joining to 1st roll st. All around work tc at regular intervals with a 
5 ch picot bet ■ or the picots may be added in another round, if 
desired. 

Heading : When the figures are completed and joined (by 3 
side picots on each), work exactly over centre 4 tc with 2 ch bet, (1 
tc in each of 4 picots,) ch 5, 4 dtc in next 2 picots and 2 on next 
figure, keeping top loop on needle and working all off at once, ch 
5, 4 tc separated by 2 ch in next 4 picots, and repeat. 



10 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



2. i tc, * ch 2, i tc in 3d st, and repeat. 

3. Tc on tc, with 2 ch bet. 

4. 3 dc under each 2 ch. 

This is a rich, showy lace, suitable for many purposes. The roll 
st is effectively used in many laces, and is fully described in No. 4 




Octo Lace. 



of the Prize Needle- work Series, page ^^. It consists simply in 
winding the thread over the needle the required number of times, 
hook in work, draw thread through, over, draw through coil, over, 
and draw through loop on needle. 



CLOVER LACE AND INSERTION. 

[Contributed by Mabel Howard, Montvale, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 40, 3 -cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel hook, size 1. Three spools will make a yard of 
lace and of insertion. 



CLOVER LACE AND INSERTION. 



11 



For the lace, ch 50 sts, turn. 

1. Tc in 8th st from hook, ch 4, miss 4, tc in next, * ch 3, tc in 
same st *, repeat from * to * twice, ch 6, miss 6, tc in next, ch 6, 
miss 6, tc in next, work from 1st to 2d # 3 times, * ch 4, miss 4, tc 
in next, repeat from * 3 times, work from 1st to 2d * 3 times, ch 3, 
turn. 

2. Sh of 6 tc and 1 dc under each loop of 3 ch, ch 3, tc on next 
tc, ch 3, 3 tc over next tc, ch 3, tc on next tc, ch 3, sh of 6 tc and 
1 dc under each 3 ch loop in open sh, ch 3, 3 tc over next tc, ch 3, 
fill next open sh as before, ch 3, tc in next tc, ch 3, tc in 4th st of 
7 ch at end, ch 5, turn. 




Clover Lace. 



3. Tc in tc, * ch 3, tc in centre of 2d sh *, repeat from * to * 3 
times, ch 5, 5 tc over 3 tc, (2 tc in 1st and last tc, and 1 tc in 
each of 3 between,) ch 5, tc in centre of 2d sh, work from'ist to 



12 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



2d * 3 times, ch 5, tc in tc, ch 3, 5 tc over 3 tc, ch 3, tc on tc, 
work from 1st to 2d * 4 times, ch 3, turn. 

4. Like 2d row, with 7 tc on 5 tc. 

5. Like 3d row, with 9 tc on 7 tc. 

6. Like 2d row, with 1 1 tc on 9 tc. 

7. Like 3d row, with 13 tc on 11 tc, as far as point; ch 3, tc 




Clover Insertion. 



in 1st tc, ch 3, tc in 3d tc of 1 1 tc, ch 3, 4 tc with 3 ch bet, form- 
ing open sh, as usual, in 7th tc, ch 3, turn. 

8. Like 6th row. 

9. Like 5 th row. 

10. Like 4th row. 

11. Like 3d row. 

12. Like 2d row. 

This completes the pattern, which, although simple, is extremely 
showy. A handsome insertion is made by omitting the point, work- 
ing both edges alike. The design is strictly original, and the lace 
suitable for aprons, sideboard scarfs, or any purpose for which a 
wide, rich lace is desirable. The insertion makes a handsome tidy 
if combined with ribbon. 



SHELL POINT LACE. 



13 



SHELL POINT LACE. 

[Contributed by Miss C. A. Ragotzky, 2252 N. 21st Street, Philadelphia, Pa.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 60, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and crochet hook, size 00. One spool makes 32 inches of 
lace. 

Ch 40 sts, turn. 

1. Miss 5 sts, 1 tc in next, * ch 1, miss 1, tc in next, repeat 
twice from *, ch 3, miss 2, dc in next, ch 5, miss 3, dc in next, miss 
2, sh of 5 tc in next, miss 2, dc in next, miss 2, sh in next, miss 2, 
dc in next, ch 5, miss 3, dc in next, ch 5, miss 3, dc in next, turn. 

2. Ch 3, sh of 5 tc in 1st dc, dc in 3d of 5 ch following, ch 5, 
dc in 3d of next 5 ch, ch 5, dc in centre of sh, sh in next dc, bet 
shs of last row, dc in centre of next sh, ch 5, fasten in 3d of 5 ch, 
ch 5, dc in top of 1st tc and in following sts to end, turn. 




Shell Point Lace. 



3. Ch 4, make a tc over tc of 1st row, with 1 ch bet each, ch 3, 
dc in 3d of 5 ch, ch 5, dc in 3d of next 5 ch, sh in next dc, * dc 
in centre of next sh, ch 5, dc in 3d of 5 ch, ch 5, dc in 3d of 5 ch, 



14 harbour's prize needle-work series. 

sh in next dc, dc in centre of sh, sh of 6 tc in top of 3 ch at end, 
turn. 

4. Ch 8, miss 5, dc in next, sh of 5 tc in 1st tc of sh following, 
dc in 4th tc of same sh, ch 5, dc in centre of next sh, sh in dc at 
end of sh, dc in 3d of 5 ch, ch 5, dc in 3d of 5 ch, ch 5, dc in 
centre of sh, ch 5, dc in centre of 5 ch, ch 5, dc in 1st tc and in each 
st following, turn. 

5. Like 3d rpw to * ; dc in 3d of 5 ch, ch 5, dc in 3d of 5 ch, 
ch 5, dc in centre of next sh, sh in next dc, at end of sh, dc in 3d 
of 5 ch, sh in next dc, dc in next sh, turn. 

6. 3 sc in 1 st 3 sts of sh, sh in next dc, bet shs, dc in centre of 
next sh, ch 5, dc in 3d of 5 ch, ch 5, dc in 3d of next 5 ch, sh in 
next dc, dc in centre of next sh, ch 5, dc in 3d of 5 ch, ch 5, dc in 
1st tc and each following st to end. 

Repeat to length desired. This beautiful pattern may be devel- 
oped in any size of thread, according to use required. In No. 30 
it makes a handsome finish for table cover of Roman linen. In 
No. 70, white, as given, a very durable trimming for aprons, under- 
wear, pillow-slips, and similar uses is had. The insertion is made 
by making both edges alike, with a row of diamonds, as shown in 
the edge, between. 



IMOGENE LACE. 

[Contributed by Miss Kathryn Plunkett, 1099 Summit Avenue, Jersey City, N.J.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace thread, or 3- 
cord, 200-yards spools, No. 60, steel hook, size 00. 
Ch 52 sts, turn. 

1. Dtc in 5 th st, 3 dtc in next 3 sts, * ch 4, miss 4, 4 dtc in 
next 4 sts, repeat from * 5 times, ch 8, turn. 

2. 4 dtc on 4 dtc of last row, * ch 2, sc in centre of 4 ch, ch 
2, 4 dtc on 4 dtc, repeat from * 5 times, ch 4, turn. 

3. Like 1st row, making 7 groups of 4 dtc, each separated by 4 
ch. After last group, ch 1, 2 dtc under 8 ch, ch 2, repeat from * 
7 times, sc in last st of foundation ch, turn; ch 8, sc bet 1st 2 



RUSSIAN OR ''SPOKE" STITCH, IN CROCHET 



15 



groups of dtc, repeat 7 times around scallop, making last sc under 
1 ch. 

4. * ch 8, sc in centre of 4 ch, repeat from * 6 times, ch 8, tc 
in dtc at end, turn. 




Imogene Lace. 

This is a beautiful pattern for one so simple. It is useful for 
many purposes, and especially effective if worked snug. If pre- 
ferred, the treble crochet stitch may be used instead of double 
treble for the groups. 



RUSSIAN OR " SPOKE" STITCH, IN CROCHET. 

[Contributed by Mrs. A. L. Wertman, Tannersville, Pa.] 

This is an entirely new and original stitch, and I take pleasure in 
presenting it to the thousands of ladies who delight in Barbour's 
beautiful needle-work books and the Irish flax lace threads. Make a 



16 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



foundation of either a ch or row of spaces, for the heading, ch 7 (or 
any requisite number of sts), take a loop around 7 ch close to 
needle, making 2 sts on needle, thread over, draw through 1 loop, 
and repeat 1 1 times, filling the ch closely, then take up thread and 
draw through all the loops on the needle at once. Do not draw so 
tight that it bends the stitch, but keep it straight, and take a loop 
through foundation at same place as before, ch 7 from that founda- 
tion st, bringing 7th ch through that st left on needle while the 
7 ch were made. Repeat. 




Russian or u Spoke " Stitch, in Crochet. 



i. Loop edging: Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 
40, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, with steel hook, size o, was used for 
the illustrated designs, but the finer thread may be substituted, as 



RUSSIAN OR "SPOKE" STITCH, IN CROCHET. 17 

with all laces, according to use. Make a foundation of spaces (tc in 
a st, ch 2, miss 2, tc in next), * then follow directions for spoke st, 
save that you draw the thread tight, bending the st to foundation, 




Memorial Lace. 

fasten with sc, then sl-st at end of loop, to round the corner. 
Repeat. 

2. Picot spoke wheel : Ch 14 *, work on 7 sts exactly as for 
spoke st, draw thread tight, ch 1, dtc in 1st of 14. ch, ch 7, and re- 
peat from * 6 times, join to 1st st. 

3. Picot rose: Ch 10, join; work exactly as for the edging, 
drawing down snug to the ring. These tiny wheels and rings are 
especially nice for use in making Battenburg lace, and may be varied 
indefinitely. The spoke st may also be used in this work, resem- 
bling the darning or Russian st. 

4. Spoke st wheel : Ch 16, join; follow directions for spoke st 
exactly, catch in ring, take up thread and draw through all loops on 



18 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

needle, taking care not to bend the st. Keep this st idle till called 
for. Catch in ring, ch 12, draw last st through idle st on hook, 8 
dc under 5 of 12 chain, and repeat until ring is full, 11 spokes. 
At the last, sl-st up back of 1st spoke, ch 5 over to last, turn, 8 dc 
under ch. A curved wheel is made thus : Ch 16, join; ch 12, work 
18 loops, draw through ring and through all loops on needle, just 
tight enough to give a curve to the st ; let the last st remain, catch 
in ring, ch 6, the last through st on needle, ch 6 again, and repeat 
from *, making 9 loops over istand 9 over 2d 6 ch. Work 10 sts 
in ring, sl-st up back of 1st spoke, and fasten to last. 

Memorial lace : 1. Ch 5, tc in 1st st, turn ; ch 5, tc in 3d st of 
previous ch, turn, ch 5, tc in 3d st of previous ch. 

2. Ch 36, miss 5, tc in each of 30 sts, ch 2, tc in 3d st of 5 ch 
at end of 3d space. 

3. Ch 5, tc on 1st tc, * ch 2, miss 2, tc in next tc, repeat 9 
times, ch 2,4 tc separated by 2 ch under 5 ch at end, work down 
the other side like 1st, ch 2, and fasten to 3d space, sl-st over 2 
sps, and turn. 

4. An extra long tc, thread over 3 times, in 1st sp, on this work 
10 loops, catch hv 1st sp, thread over and draw through all loops, 
catch in next sp, ch 8, drawing last st through st on needle, 3 dc 
under 2 of 8 ch and repeat the spoke st. Work all around, making 
2 spokes in each of 4 sps around scallop. At end, ch 5, draw 
through st on loop, ch 2, extra long tc in end. To start 2d scallop 
have 5 instead of 3 sps, making in same way, one over another. To 
join 2d scallop to 1st, after 1 dc in bar, ch 4, catch in opposite side, 
ch 4, dc on ch ; repeat to join 9 spokes. 

This is a very rich and handsome lace for trimming scarfs, etc. 
If desired, narrow ribbon may be run in spaces formed by tc. 



TABLE SQUARE, WITH BORDER. 

[Contributed by Miss Ellen Muller, Box 4, 95 Western Boulevard, New York, X.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 25, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, steel hook, size 2, and square of linen 12x12 inches. 



TABLE SQUARE, WITH BORDER 



19 



Hemstitch the linen, drawing 4 threads 1^ inches from edge, to 
make ^-inch hem; for this use No. 120 of the flax thread. Work 
around the square with close buttonhole stitch, or make a ch of re- 
quired length, as preferred. In this work 1 tc, ch 1, miss 1, tc in 




Table Square, with Border. 



next, and at corners 3 tc with ch between, to turn smoothly. In 
this work 1 dc in a st, then another row like 1st. 

For the wheels : Ch 8, join; 16 dc in ring, join. Ch 18, miss 1 
dc, sc in next, turn; * 8 dc over 6 of ch, ch 12, turn, miss 1 dc, 



20 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

fasten in next, turn, repeat from * 6 times, ch 6, turn, fasten back 
under preceding ch, sl-st to base of ch, taking care not to draw 
work, turn, fill ch with dc all around the wheel. Work dc in each st 
of preceding round, thus : 3 dc, ch 3, dc in same st and 4 dc, ch 3, 
dc in same st and 3 dc, 3 dc, ch 3, dc in same st; ch 15, fasten 
back bet 2 picots on preceding scallop, sl-st in next dc back, turn and 
fill the ch with dc, fasten in next dc, turn, dc in dc around, fasten in 
next dc back, turn, 3 dc, * 1 picot, 2 dc, and repeat until you have 
9 picots, finish with 3 dc, 1 dc in dc next below picot, and repeat 
around. 

This completes the wheel. These are joined by 3d and 4th picots 
on side, leaving 2 at base and one at top of arch. To the centre 
they are joined by 3 top picots. The small wheels connecting with 
centre are begun with 6 ch, the 1st bar of 15 and others of 10 sts, 
caught back with 5 ch ; otherwise the same, and connected with 5 
ch picots to large wheels and centre. 

This design may be utilized for scarf-ends, bed-spreads, etc., etc., 
and in No. 18 of Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace thread, in 
balls, is especially rich and heavy. 



DOILY IN FILAGREE WORK. 

[Contributed by Amelia B. Thorpe, Lakeville, Conn.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 70, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel hook, size o. The same design, using No. 25 or 
No. 30 thread, makes a handsome table-mat. 

Ch 50, join, work around this ring with 3 rounds of dc, widening 
every 5th st in 1st round, every 6th st in 2d round, and every 7th 
st in 3d round. 

4. Ch 5, 2 triple tc in 2 dc next to ch, * ch 6, miss 4, 3 tr tc in 
next 3 dc, repeat from * 10 times, ch 6, join to top of 5 ch. 

5, 6, 7. Dc in each st, widening in each round over every group 
of tr tc. 

8. 1 dc, ch 5, * 2 dc, ch 5, making picot edge all around, and 
finishing large wheel, save spider-web in centre. 



DOILY IN FILAGREE WORK, 



21 



For small wheels : Begin with ch 40, make 3 rounds of dc, 
widening every 4th st in 1st round, every 5th st in 2d, and every 
6th st in 3d. Make picot edge as directed, joining to large wheel 
by 3 picots, and to preceding small wheel by 3 picots, 5 picots from 




Doily in Filagree Work. 



where joined to large wheel. Miss 6 picots in large wheel bet 
joinings. Join last small wheel to 1st, carry twisted bars across 
centre of each, and weave the little web over and under, weave a 
little triangle of twisted bars bet wheels, and the doily is complete. 
It is very quickly and easily made, and an original design. The 
applications of this work are limitless. 



22 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

CENTRE-PIECE OR TIDY. 

[Contributed by Amy L. Lough, 65 Fairview Avenue, Plainfield, N.J.J 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, white, No. 25, 3-cord, 200- 
yards spools, steel hook, size 3 \ 3 spools will be sufficient. 

This pattern is an original combination, showing what beautiful 
articles may be evolved from those already published in the Prize 
Needle-work Series. The wheels and leaves are from the " Leaf 
Tidy," in No. 2. 

For the wheel, ch 6, join. 

1. Ch 3, 15 tc in ring, join to top of 3 ch with 1 sc. 

2. Ch 6, miss 2, 1 tc bet 2 tc, * ch 3, miss 2, 1 tc, and repeat 
from * 6 times, ch 3, join to 3d of 6 ch. 

3. Ch 3, 2 tc in 1 st sp, ch 7, 3 tc in same, * 3 tc in next sp, ch 
7, 3 tc in same, repeat from * 6 times, join to top of 3 ch. 

4. 14 tc under 7 ch, 1 dc bet groups of 3 tc \ repeat. 

Leaf: Ch 14, turn; miss 2, 1 dc in 11 sts, 3 in 12th, 10 

down other side of ch, turn. 

2. Ch 1, miss~ist dc, 10 dc in next 10, 3 in centre of last 3 sts, 
n in next 11, turn. 

3. Ch 1, miss 1 dc, 11 dc in 11, 3 in 1, 10 in next 10, turn. 
Alternate these 2 rows until you have 6 ridges, join to wheel by 

centre st of 3, in middle of scallop, and to each other by sts at both 
ends of last row. Five leaves are required to each wheel, or half- 
wheel on outside, and 8 in centre. 
Pentagon : Ch 5, join. 

1. 10 dc in ring, turn. 

2. 1 dc in last st, * 3 in next, 1 in next, repeat from * to form 5 
groups of 3 dc each, always working in back of st \ turn. 

3. Dc in every st, 1 in thread where it crossed when you turned 
last, turn. 

Continue until you have 9 rows, widening every 2d row over the 
middle st of last row. 

10. Without turning, ch 4, tc in st from which ch started, ch 1 
and 1 tc all around, into every 2d st, 3 in widening, and 1 in st at 
starting. 



CENTRE-PIECE OR TIDY. 



23 



II, 12. Dc all around, as before, widening at the corners. 

13. Like 10th row. 

14, 15, 16, 17, 81. Like nth and 12th, putting an extra st in 




Centre-piece or Tidy. 



last st of each row. Join last row to points of 2 leaves in centre 
wheel. Leave an end to join to next pentagon. 

The leaves on the outside should be one row shorter than those in 
the centre. When completed, lay smoothly on an ironing table, 
fold over it a wet cloth, with a thickness of cloth besides, press with 



24 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



a hot iron, and you are sure to be pleased with the effect. It looks 
very handsome on the top of a polished table, and is just the thing 
for a tabouret-cover. The heavy flax thread gives an especially rich 
effect in work of this kind. 



FANCY BAG. 

[Contributed by Miss Kate E. Maxwell, 225 So. G Street, Tacom a, Wash.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax 
thread, ecru, No. 60, 1 ball or 
spool, steel hook, size o, 4 yards 
ribbon, No. 2. 

Ch 9, join. 

1. Ch 3, 24 tc in ring, join to 
top of 3 ch. 

2. 1 dc in each st. Con- 
tinue 19 rows of dc, widening 
sufficiently to make the work lie 
flat, in order to form the bot- 
tom of the bag. If it is wanted 
larger, enlarge the bottom as de- 
sired. 

3. Ch 3, 4 tc in same place, 
miss 2 sts, 5 tc in next, miss 2, 5 
tc in next, ch 3, miss 4, forming 
space for ribbon > make 3 shells 
as before, and so continue. The 
model has 8 spaces for ribbon, 
separated by groups of 3 shells 
each. Join last 3 ch to top of 3 
ch at beginning. 

4. Sl-st in 2 tc, ch 3, 4 tc in 
same place, 5 tc in 3d tc of next 
sh, same in next, ch 3, shs in next 
shs, and repeat, joining to top of 

Fancy Bag. 3 cil * 




Barbour's Prize Needle-Work, Series No. 6, 



PORTIERE FOR BOOK-CASE, 



WW 





Barbour's Prize Needle-Work. Series No. 6. 




Portiere for Book-Case. 

MATERIALS;— Barbour's Ulster Rope Linen Floss, 3 skeins 
each of shade No. 2, No. 4 and No. 5, 6 skeins shade 
No. 30>^, and 3 yards of blue-green denim or linen, as 
preferred. 

ITTLE description is required, the design being so 
perfectly shown. Divide the material in two 
pieces, turn a hem at top and bottom, and feather- 
stitch or cat-stitch with the floss. The hem may 
be turned from the wrong to the right side, and 30% floss be 
used for the cat-stitching. This shade is also used to outline 
the stems and leaves, and for the filling— in of the latter. 
The stitch employed for this purpose is one taken from old 
Turkish embroideries, and is sometimes called "Ismit" stitch. 
It is especially adapted to the filling of long, narrow petals, 
and is more open than the "Janina" stitch, found elsewhere, 
which it somewhat resembles. It is simply a broad cat-stitch 
or cross-stitch, begun at the tip of the leaf and worked from 
one. The flowers, representing the favorite " sun-burst/' are 
worked in long and short stitch, the centres being filled in 
satin stitch, with shade 30^ floss. 

While so simple that a lady without previous experience 
in embroidering need have no hesitation in undertaking to 
copy it, this design is extremely effective, and may be adapted 
to table-scarfs, sofa-pillows and other articles of home deco- 
ration and use. Any colors liked may be chosen. A charming 
combination would be of brown linen or denim, with the 
design carried out in darker browns and yellows. 



See 




infant's bib. 25 

Continue in this way for 22 rows, or until the bag is as deep 
as wanted. 

5. 1 tc in a st, ch 1, miss 1, tc in next, repeat. 

6. 2 long sts (thread over 3 times) in 2 tc over 1st sh, ch 3, 
2 1 sts over next sh, ch 3, 2 1 sts over next sh, ch 3, and repeat, 
forming spaces for draw-strings. 

7. Like 5 th row. 

8. Sh of 2 dtc, *picot, (4 ch, dc in 1st st,) 1 dtc, repeat from * 
until there are 7 picots, 1 dtc, miss 2 tc, dc in next, miss 2 tc, sh in 
next, and repeat. 

Run ribbon in spaces, having loops to hang by. The rich ecru 
of Barbour's crochet and lace thread, in balls, combined with car- 
dinal ribbon, is very pleasing. The bag makes a beautiful gift to a 
friend interested in lace-making — and few ladies are not, at the 
present time. In No. 25 or No. 35, using steel hook, size 1, a very 
nice darning or " stocking bag" is produced, which may be lined 
with cotton surah or silesia, if desired. This is also, unlined, ser- 
viceable as a sponge bag. 



INFANT'S BIB. 

[Contributed by Estella Ball, Talmage, Kansas.] 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 100, steel hook, size 
000, skein Ulster etching flax, white, and two thicknesses of linen, 
shape of bib. 

Buttonhole the edges together in long and short stitch, and 
featherstitch around all but the neck with floss. In the buttonholing 
work dc all around. For the edge around neck : # Ch 2, miss 2, 1 
tc in next st, picot, (ch 5, dc in 1st st,) tc in same place as last tc, 
ch 2, miss 2, dc in next, repeat from *. 

For the lace around bib : 

1. 7 dc, ch 7, miss 6, repeat around ; turn. 

2. 5 dc in 7 dc, ch 5, 1 dc in 4th of 7 ch, ch 5, repeat ; turn. 

3. 3 dc in 5 dc, ch 5, 5 dc over 1 dc, (2 on each side, and 1 in 
1 dc,) ch 5, repeat; turn. 



26 



barbour's prize needle-work series. 



4. Dc in 3 dc, ch 5, 9 dc over 5 dc, as described, ch 5, repeat; 
turn. 

5. Ch 7, 7 dc in 9 dc, repeat; turn. 

6. Ch 5, 5 dc in 7 dc, ch 5, 1 dc in 4th of 7 ch, repeat; turn. 

7. Ch 5, fasten with dc under 5 ch, ch 5, fasten under next 5 ch, 
ch 5, 3 dc in 5 dc, repeat; turn. 




Infant's Bib. 



8. Ch 6, dc in 2d st, forming a picot, ch 2, fasten under 5 ch, 
ch 6, picot, ch 2, fasten under next 5 ch, ch 6, picot, ch 2, dc in 
3 dc, repeat. 

This completes the edge, which is very dainty and durable. It 
may be applied to many uses. If a more elaborate bib is wanted, 
sprays of flowers in delicate shades may be scattered over the linen 
instead of featherstitching, using the etching flax in colors. For the 
wee ones, however, white seems more appropriate. 



STAR CENTRE-PIECE. 27 

STAR CENTRE-PIECE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Julia H. Stoeckel, Jerseyville, 111.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 80, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, steel hook, size 000. Three spools of thread required. 
Ch 6, join. 

1. Ch 3, 13 tc in ring, join with sc to top of 3 ch. 

2. Ch 13, 1 tc in 4th and each following ch, miss 1 tc of 1st 
round, 1 dc in next ; repeat 6 times, forming 7 spokes ; join last 
to same st 1st was begun with. 

3. Ch 2, 1 dc in tc missed in last round, ch 13, and make 7 
spokes as before ; after joining, work 1 sc in each st of 1st spoke to 
the top. 

4. 2 dc in top of spoke, ch 5,2 dc in top of next spoke, and 
repeat all around. 

5. Ch 3, 1 tc in each st of last round, join to top of 3 ch. 

6. Like 5th round. 

7. Like 5 th round, increasing by 2 tc in every 6th st. 

8. 9. Like 7th round. 

10. Ch 9, 1 dc in 4th st ; repeat. 

11. 1 sc in each of 1st 5 sts of 9 ch, # ch 9, sc in 5th st of 
next 9 ch ; repeat all around. 

' 12. Sc it each of 1st 4 sts of 9 ch, dc in 5th st, * ch 9, dc in 
5 th of next 9 ch, repeat from # all around. 

13. Ch 5, 3 tc in 5th st of 9 ch, 5 ch, dc in dc of last round, 
and repeat. 

14. Sc in each st of 5 ch and 1st tc, dc in 2d tc, * ch 5, dc in 
next 2d tc, repeat from *. 

15. Ch 3, tc in each st of last round, join. 

16. Like 15th, increasing in every 10th st. 

17. Ch 8, cross-trebles all around : * Dtc in 1st st, work off half 
the loops, miss 1 st, tc in next, work off all loops on hook, 2 at a 
time, ch 1, tc in centre of cross-treble, ch 2, miss 1, and repeat 
from *. At the last make 1 dtc, work off 2 loops, join to 3d st 
from bottom of 8 ch at beginning, work off rest of loops, ch 1, join 
to 3d of 8 ch. 



28 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



18. Ch 3, tc in each st, join. 

19. Like 1 8th, making a sufficient number of extra sts so that 
there will be 336 in the round when completed. 

20. Ch 3, tc in each of 52 sts, ch 6, make a picot by fastening 
back in 5 th st from needle with 1 dc, ch 1, miss 3 tc, * 53 tc, picot 




Star Centre-piece. 



(always made as described, 6 ch, dc in 5th from needle, ch 1), and 
repeat from *, joining last picot to top of 3 ch. 

21. Sc in 1st tc, ch 3, tc in each of 50 tc, picot, tc in picot of last 
round, picot, tc in same place, picot, miss 1 tc, tc in each of 51 tc, 
and repeat around, joining last picot to top of 3 ch. 

22. Sc in 1st tc, ch 3, tc in each of 48 tc, p, tc in tc, p, tc in p, 



TWINE-HOLDER. 29 

p, tc in same place, p, tc in next tc, p, miss first tc, tc in 49 tc, and 
repeat, joining as before. 

23. Sc in 1 st tc, 3 ch, tc in 46 tc, p, tc in 1st tc of open point, 
p, then in next tc, p, tc in p of last round, p, tc in same place, p, tc 
in next tc, p, tc in next tc, p, miss 1 tc, tc in each of 47 tc, and 
repeat, joining to top of 3 ch. 

The remaining rows are made in exactly the same way, the plain 
point decreasing 1 st on each side, and the open or picot point 
widening as described in 23d round. The last row will be all pi- 
cots with 1 tc between, and the work is so simple that no one will 
have difficulty in working it. This makes a beautiful centre for a 
polished table. If desired, it may be made of coarser thread, 
which would add to its size, and render it more desirable for many 
purposes. 



TWINE-HOLDER. 

[Contributed by Kate E. Maxwell, Tacoma, Wash.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax lace and crochet thread, in balls, 
No. 50, ecru, steel hook, size 0,1^ yards No. 2 ribbon, blue, and ball 
of druggist's twine, matching ribbon in color. 

Ch 6, join. 

1. Ch 3, 23 tc in ring, join with sc to top of 3 ch. 

2. Ch 3, miss 1 tc, dc in next, and repeat around. 

3. (Ch 3, dc under 3 ch) 3 times, ch 3, dc under same 3 ch 
as last ; repeat. 

4. Ch 3, dc under .3 ch ; repeat. 

Continue working in this way, trying the ball occasionally to 
see if the work fits nicely. Some ladies crochet loose, others tight, 
so it is difficult to give exact rules for all. As you work up the 
side, little if any widening will be required. Make 16 rows of ch 
in all. 

17. 3 dc under each loop and 1 dc in fastening dc. 

18. Ch 6, miss 2, dtc in dc, ch 2, miss 2, dtc in next, repeat 
around, joining to 4th of 6 ch. This forms spaces for ribbon. 



30 



BARBOUR S PRIZK NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



19. Dc in each st all around. 

20. Ch 3, miss 3, dc in next ; repeat. 

21, 22, 23, 24, 25. Ch 3, 

dc under 3 ch ; repeat. 

26. Like 19th row. It is 
well to put the ch loops in 
while working this row, thus : 
Ch 70, dc in same st, dc in 
next 6 sts, ch 70, dc in same 
st, and so continue. If pre- 
ferred, these ch loops may be 
joined in after this row is 
completed : Ch 35, dc in dc, 
ch 35, join in ist st of first 35 
ch, ch 35, miss 5 sts, ch 35, 
join, and repeat. 

Weave the ribbon in and 
out the spaces and tie in a 
pretty bow. Tie a bow where 
the chains join, put in the 
twine, and draw from the bot- 
tom. This is a dainty little 
Christmas gift. The Irish flax 
thread is superior to silk for 

such work, as it may be laundered and gain rather than lose in 

attractiveness. 




Twine-holder. 



DRAWN LACE, WITH FRINGE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Alfred Barton, 553 Clark Street, Waverly, N.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 25, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel needles, No. 17. 

Cast on 34 sts ; k across plain. 

1. SI 1, k 1, o, n, o, n, o, n, o, n, k 2, (o 3, k 1) 10 times, k 
1, (o 3, k 1) 10 times, k 1. 



DRAWN LACE, WITH FRINGE, 



31 



2. K i, * si off io sts, drawing out the " o " loops to make as 
long and even as possible, transfer to left needle and si last 5 over 




Drawn Lace, with Fringe. 



i st 5, knitting as you do this, then knit the 5 remaining *,ki, re- 
peat * to *, k 3, (o, n) 4 times, k 1. 



32 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

3. SI 1, k 1, (o, n) 4 times, k 21. Have fringe twice width of 
pattern, put on needle, k 1, draw fringe toward you, k 1, draw back, 
k 1. 

4. K 25, (o, n) 4 times, k 1. 

5. SI 1, k 1, (o, n) 4 times, k 3, (o, n) 9 times; put in fringe. 

6. Like 4th row. 

7. Like 3d row. 

8. Like 4th row. 

9. SI 1, k 1, (o, n) 4 times, k 3, o, n, o, n, (o 3, k 1) 10 times, 
0, n, o, n \ fringe. 

10. K 7, repeat * to * in 2d row, k 8, (o, n) 4 times, k 1. 

11. Like 7th row. 

12. Like 4th row. 

13. Like 5 th row. 

14. Like 4th row. 

15. Like 7 th row. 

16. v Like 4th row. 

Finish with 1st 2 rows unless sewed together. This forms a very 
handsome finish for commode or bureau scarfs, and may be of 
coarser or finer thread, as desired. Without the fringe it makes a 
beautiful lace, and may be readily made narrower to suit purpose 
for which designed. 



HEART LACE. 

[Contributed by S. H. Latimer, Plattsburg, Miss.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 90, 3 -cord, 200-yards 
spools, and 2 steel needles, No. 16. 
Cast on 58 sts. 

1. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 5 times, n, o 2, n, k 8, n, o 2, n, 
o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 4 times, n, o 2, n, k 8, n, o 2, n, k 
4 tog. 

2. K 3, p 1, k n, p 1, k 3, o 2, p 2 tog (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, 
k 2, p 1, k it, p 1, k 3, o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 4 times. 

3. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 4 times, n, o 2, n, k 8, n, o 2, n, 



HEART LACE, 



33 



k 2, o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, n, o 2, n, k 8, n, o 2, n, k 2, 
o 2, p 1. 

4. O 2, p 2 tog, o, p 1, o, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 11, p 1, k 3, o 2, p 
2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, k 2, p 1, k 1 1, p 1, k 3, o 2, p 2 tog, 
(o, p 2 tog) 3 times. 

5. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, n, o 2, n, k 8, n, o 2, n, 




Heart Lace. 



k 2, o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, n, o 2, n, k 8, n, o 2, n, k 
2, o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) twice. 

6. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, k 2, p 1, k 11, p 1, k 3, 
o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, k 2, p 1, k 11, p i, k 3, o 2, p 
2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) twice. 

7. O 2, p 2 tog, (o ; p 2 tog) twice, n, o 2, n, k 8, n, o 2, n, k 
2, 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, n, o 2, n, k 8, n, o 2, n, k 2, 
o 2, p 2 tog, ( o, p 2 tog) 3 times. 



34 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

8. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 4 times, k 2, pi, k n,pi,k 1, 
o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 4 times, k 2, p 1, k 11, p 1, k 1, o 2, p 
2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) twice. 

9. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, n, o 2, n, k 4, n, o 2, n, 
k 2, o 2,>p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 5 times, n, o 2, n, k 4, n, o 2, n, k 
2, o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 4 times. 

10. O 2, p 2 tog, ( o, p 2 tog) 5 times, k 2, p 1, k 7, p 1, k 1, 
o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 6 times, k 2, p 1, k 7, p 1, k 1, o 2, p 2 
tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times. 

11. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 4 times, n, o 2, n, n, o 2, n, k 2, 
o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 7 times, n, o 2, n, n, o 2, n, k 2, o 2, p 2 
tog, (o, p 2 tog) 5 times. 

12. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 6 times, k 2, p 1, k 3, p 1, k 1, 
o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 8 times, k 2, p 1, k 3, p 1, k 1, o 2, p 2 
tog, (o, p 2 tog) 4 times. 

13. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 5 times, n, o 2, n, k 2, o 2, p 2 
tog, ^(o, p 2 tog) 9 times, n, o 2, n, k 2, o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 
6 times. 

14. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 6 times, k 4, p 1, k 3, o 2, p 2 
tog, (o, p 2 tog) 8 times, k 4, p 1, k 3, o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 
4 times. 

15. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 4 times, n, o 2, n, n, o 2, n, k 2, 
o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 7 times, n, o 2, n, n, o 2, n, k 2, o 2, p 2 
tog, (o, p 2 tog) 5 times. 

16. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 5 times, k 4, p 1, k 3, p 1, k 3, o 
2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 6 times, k 4, p 1, k 3, p 1, k 3, o 2, p 2 tog, 
(o, p 2 tog) 3 times. 

17. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, n, o 2, n, k 4, n, o 2,n, 
k 2, o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 5 times, n, o 2, n, k 4, n, o 2, n, k 2, 
o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 4 times. 

18. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 4 times, k 4, p 1, k 7, p 1, k 3, 
o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 4 times, k 4, p 1, k 7, p 1, k 3, o 2, p 2 
tog, (o, p 2 tog) twice. 

19. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) twice, n, o 2, n, k 8, n, o 2, n, k 
2, o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, n, o 2, n, k 8, n, o 2, n, k 2, 
o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times. 



SERPENTINE LACE. 35 

20. 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, k 4, p 1, k 1 1, p 1, k 1, 
o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, k 4, p 1, k 1 1, p 1, k 1, o 2, p 2 
tog, (o t p 2 tog) twice. 

21. O 2, p 2 tog, (o 3 p 2 tog) 3 times, n, o 2, n, k 8, n, o 2, n, 
k 2, o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, n, o 2, n, k 8, n, o 2, n, k 2, 
o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) twice. 

22. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) twice, k 4, pi,kn,pi,ki,o 
2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, k 4, p 1, k 11, p 1, k 1,0 2, p 2 
tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times. 

23. O 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 4 times, n, o 2, n, k 8, n, o 2, n> 
k 2, o 2, p 2 tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, n, o 2, n, k 8, n, o 2, n, k 2, 
2, p 2 tog, o, p 2 tog. 

24. O 2, p 2 tog, o, p 2 tog, k 4, p 1, k 11, p 1, k 1,0 2,p2 
tog, (o, p 2 tog) 3 times, k 4, p 1, k 11, p 1, k 1, o 2, p 2 tog, (o, 
p 2 tog) 4 times. 

Repeat from first row. A narrower lace may have but one row of 
the " hearts," and the insertion to match the lace is easily made. 
In coarse flax thread, say No. 40, this lace makes a beautiful finish 
for the ends of scarfs, etc. In fact, by varying the size of needles 
and number of thread, one may have laces to suit any require- 
ment. Having used Barbour's Irish flax thread for knitting or other 
lace-work, I am sure ladies will be satisfied with no other. 

It will be understood that after a " purl " the thread is not put 
back before making the required number of " overs." 



SERPENTINE LACE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. S. H. Carter, Plattsburg, Miss.] 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 100, 3-cord, 200- 
yards spools, and steel needles, No. 16. 
Cast on 53 sts. 

1. (O 2, p 2 tog, o 2, si 1, k 3 tog, b si st over, k 1) 7 times, 
o 2, p 2 tog, o 2, k 2. (After "p" the thread is not put back 
before next " o.") 

2. (K 3, p 1, k 1, o 2, p 2 tog) 8 times. 



36 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



3. (O 2, p 2 tog, k 5) 8 times. 

4. K 5, (o 2, p 2 tog, o 2, si 1, k 3 tog, b, k 1) 7 times, o 2, 
p 2 tog. 

5. (O 2, p 2 tog, k 3, p 1, k 1) 7 times, o 2, p 2 tog, k 5. 




Serpentine Lace. 

6. Bind off 3, k 1, (o 2, p 2 tog, k 5) 7 times, o 2, p 2 tog. 

Repeat from 1st row. An "o" is required for every st nar- 
rowed. 

This is a very desirable pattern for many purposes, and may be 
made wider or narrower at pleasure. Barbour's Irish flax thread is 
absolutely the best for this kind of work. 



DIAGONAL POINT LACE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. T. O. Carter, Plattsburg, Miss.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 90, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, steel needles, No. 17. 



DIAGONAL POIXT LACE 



37 



Cast on 19 sts. 

1. o 2, p 2 tog, k 2, o 3, p 2 tog, o, p 2 tog, n, * k 6, p 1, k 2, 

loop on 7 sts. 

2. K 17, o 3, p 2 tog, o, p 2 tog, n, k 1, o 2, p 2 tog. 

3. Like 1 st row to * ; k 10, * o 3, p 2 tog, o, p 2 tog, k 2 in 
each of next 2 sts by k 1st on upper, 2d on under thread of st. 

4. Bind off 2, k 1, o 3, p 2 tog, o, p 2 tog, k 12, o 3, p 2 tog, 
o, p 2 tog, n, k 1,0 2, p 2 tog. 

5. Like 1st to * ; k 8, k 3 tog, o 3, p 2 tog, o, p 2 tog, k 1, k 
2 in each of next 2 sts. 

6. B 3, k 1, o 3, p 2 tog, o, p 2 tog, k 11, o 3, p 2 tog, o, p 2 
tog, n, k 1, o 2, p 2 tog. 

7. Like 5th row, only k 7 instead of 8. 




Diagonal Point Lace. 



8. Like 6th row, with 10 plain instead of 1 1 

9. Like 7th row, with 6 sts k plain. 

10. Like 8th row, 9 plain. 

11. Like 5th, 5 plain. 

12. Like 6th row, 8 plain. 



38 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

13. Like 5th, 4 plain. 

14. Like 6th, 7 plain. 

15. Like 5th, 3 plain. 

16. Like 6th, 6 plain. 

17. Like 5th, 2 plain after *. 

18. Like 6th, 5 plain. 

ig. Like 5th, 1 plain after *. 

20. Like 6th, 4 plain. 

21. Like 1st row to * ; k 3 tog, o 3, p 2 tog, o, p 2 tog, k 1, k 2 
in 2 sts. 

22. Like 6, 3 plain. 

Repeat from 1st row. This is an original design, and a very 
pretty lace for any purpose. The upper part makes a beautiful in- 
sertion, omitting points and knitting both edges alike. It resembles 
drawn work. Coarser thread and needles may be used with good 
effect, 



KNITTED STAR DOILY. 

[Contributed by Mrs. T. O. Carter, Plattsburg, Miss.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread No. go, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, 2 steel needles No. 16. A spool is sufficient for one doily. 
Cast on 52 sts. 

1. SI 1, k 26, k 3 tog, o 2, k 3 tog, * (o 2, k 3 tog, k 1) 4 
times, o 2, k 1, in next st k 1, p 1, in last st k 1, p 1, k 1. 

2. SI 1, k 6, p 1 (k 3, p 1) 4 times, * k 2, p 1, k 26, leave 2. 

3. SI 1, k 23, k 3 tog, o 2, k 3, * (o 2, k 3 tog, k 1) 4 times., 
o 2, k 7. 

4. Bind off 5, k 2, p 1, (k 3, p 1) 4 times, * k 4, p 1, k 23, 
leave 4. 

5. SI 1, k 20, k 3 tog, o 2, k 5 ; like first row from *. 

6. Like 2d row to * ; k 6, p 1, k 20, leave 6. 

7. SI 1, k 17, k 3 tog, o 2, k 7 ; like 3d row from *. 

8. Like 4th row to * : k 8, p 1, k 17, leave 8. 

9. SI 1, k 14, k 3 tog, o 2, k 9 i like first row from *. 



KNITTED STAR DOILY. 



39 



io. Like 2d row to*; k 10, p i, k 14, leave 10. 

11. SI 1, k 11, k 3 tog, o 2, k 2, n, o 2, k 3 tog, o 2, n, k 2, 
like 3d row from *. 

12. Like 4th row to * ; k 4, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 4, p 1, k 1 1, leave 
12. 




Knitted Star Doi 



13. SI i, k 8, k 3 tog, o 2, k 2, n, o 2, k 5, o 2, n, k 2 ; like' 
1 st row from *. 

14. Like 2d row to * • k 4, p 1, k 6, p 1, k 4, p 1, k 8, leave 
14. 

15. SI 1, k 8, o 2, k 3 tog, k 2, o 2, k 3 tog, k 1, k 3 tog, o 2, 
k 2, k 3 tog *, (o 2, k 1, k 3 tog) 4 times, o 2, k 7. 

16. Like 4th row to * • (k 4, p 1) 3 times, k 7, leave 16. 

17. SI 1, k 7,0 2, k 3 tog, n, k 1,0 2, k 3 tog, o 2, k 1, n, k 



40 BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 

3 tog, *, (o 2, k i, k 3 tog) 4 times, o 2, k i, in next st k 1, p 1, 
in last st k 1, p 1, k 1. 

18. Like 2d row to * ; k 4, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 4, p 1, k 6, leave 
18. 

19. SI 1, k 6, o 2, k 3 tog, k 7, k 3 tog ; like 15th row from # . 

20. Like 4th row to # ; k 10, p 1, k 5, leave 20. 

21. SI 1, k 5, o 2, k 3 tog, k §, k 3 tog; like 17th row from *. 

22. Like 2d row to # ; k 8, p 1, k 4, leave 22. 

23. SI 1, k 4, o 2, k 3 tog, k 3, k 3 tog; like 15th row from # . 

24. Like 4th row to # ; k 6,. p 1, k 3, leave 24. 

25. SI 1, k 3, o 2, k 3 tog, k 1, k 3 tog; like 17th row from # . 

26. Like 2d row to * ; k 4, p 1, k 2, leave 26. 

27. SI 1, k 2, o 2, si 2, k 3 tog, b 2 ; like 15th row from # . 

28. Like 4th row to # ; k 2, p 1, k 29. 
Repeat from 1st row 14 times. 

This^is an original design, and thought very pretty. It is easily 
changed to form other patterns. Omitting the diamonds and add- 
ing to the outer border you will have a beautiful spider-web doily, 
or the pointed centre with diamond border makes a handsome 
piece of work. The size may be varied by different number of 
stitches or of threads. Barbour's Irish flax threads are superior for 
work of this kind. 



MALTESE CENTRE-PIECE. 

[Contributed by Miss Annie Williams, Steubenville, Ohio.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace thread, in balls, 
or 3-cord, 200-yards spools, ecru, No. 40, steel hook, size 1, Mal- 
tese lace-pin, No. 1 (inch prongs), and linen square, 7x7 inches 
when completed. Two spools of No. 40 thread will be required, 
and 1 spool No. 90 for hemstitching and sewing lace to centre. 

Explicit directions for Maltese work are given in No. 2, page 32, 
and in No. 4, page 31. This is slightly heavier. Make a loop in 
thread, put on prong of pin, turn, dc under thread, 2 stc under same 
thread, turn, and repeat until there are 112 loops on one side ; join 



Barbour's Prize Needle-Work, Series No. 6 




COLONIAL SOFA PILLOW, 




SEE THAT ALL YOUR 

Linen Thread carries 

This Trade Mark. 



Barbour's Prize Needle-Work, Series No, 6. 



Colonial Sofa Pillow. 




MATERlALSr-Barbour's Ulster Rope Linen Floss, Sskeins 
shade No. 60, 3 skeins No. X, 2 skeins No. 40, and a 
square of light green art denim. 

HE scrolls are outlined with shade No. 6o, as are 
also the leaves or petals in the central design, 
these leaves being filled in with shade No. % t 
using the same stitch described in " Portiere for 
Book-Case. " The flowers are outlined with shade y 2 , petals 
filled in with same in feather-stitch, or with what is known in 
lace-making as " Sorrento bars/' twisted from the centre stem 
to the edge. The square is outlined with shade No. 40, with 
cross-stitches at the intersections of lines, and the whole effect 
is unique and rich in the extreme. Either a cord or frill may 
be used as finish. A new method of making the frill is to 
double a strip of ordinary width — say 6 inches — bringing both 
edges together and shirring over a large, pliable cord or rope. 
Complete, the frill is thus a*bout 2J^ inches wide. A heavy 
cord is a handsome finish, however, and this is easily made by 
following directions: Ch 11, close in a ring, and holding the 
ring between thumb and forefinger, without twisting, work 
dc in each stitch of ch. Then simply crochet around and 
around, working from inside of ring. The stitch in which the 
hook should be inserted each time is the left half stitch of 
previous round, lying outside of work, between the spiral 
rows. A little practice will enable one to work rapidly, and 
the cord is a very handsome one. A cord twisted of strips of 
cloth, or a large cotton cord may be drawn through to hold the 
shape. 

This design, carried out entirely in white, on gray-blue 
denim, would be charming ; or the combination of delft blues 
on pale brown or gray foundation will be found effective. 
Indeed, ladies will especially enjoy trying for new variations of 
designs and colors, encouraged by the success which a use of 
the Ulster floss in all work of this kind insures. 



See £0£* 

That all fff 

Linen -d| 
Thread ^J* 
carries -< *><#ii 

this Trade=Mark. 




MALTESE CENTRE-PIECE, 



41 



without breaking thread, make a " knot-stitch " length of loop, join- 
ing to the top of loop, then* (ch 3, dc on 1 loop) twice, (ch 3,dc 
on 2 loops together) 12 times, (ch 3, dc on 1 loop) twice; repeat 
from * 3 times, join, without breaking thread, 1 k-st, fasten to centre 




Maltese Centre-piece. 



of lace on wrong side, 1 k-st, fasten to top of loop on opposite side ; * 
dc on 2 loops together 4 times, (ch 3, dc on 2 loops) 7 times, dc on 
2 loops together 3 times, repeat from * 3 times, join and cut thread. 
Baste this hollow square on the linen square, corners to sides, and 
buttonhole around in long and short sts ; * 2 short sts, 1 st ^ inch 
long, 1 st y 2 inch, 1 st % inch, and repeat. The 4-leaf clover in 



42 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

centre and the 3 -leaf clovers in corners are outlined and worked 
with long and short sts. This work is especially pleasing done in 
Ulster etching flax, shade 40 (ecru). 

Make a strip of Maltese work of 944 loops, marking every 236th 
loop. Fasten these to centre side of linen square. Make a k-st, 
join to top of loop next to square, * (ch 3, dc on 2 loops) 14 times, 
pin to corner of square (ch 4, dc on loop) 8 times, (ch 4, dc on 2 
loops) 5 times, (ch 3, dc on 2 loops) 3 times, (ch 1, dc on 2 
loops) 7 times, (ch 3, dc on 2 loops) 3 times, (ch 4, dc on 2 
loops) 5 times, dc on 2 loops together opposite, (ch 4, dc on loop, 
dc on opposite loop) twice; this forms 1st leaf. (Ch 4, dc on 
loop) 5 times, (ch 4, dc on 2 loops) 5 times, (ch 3, dc on. 2 loops) 
3 times, (ch 1, dc on 2 loops) 13 times, (ch 3, dc on 2 loops) 3 
times, (ch 4, dc on 2 loops) 5 times, dc on 2 loops opposite, (ch 
4, dc on loop, dc on loop, opposite side) twice, forming 2d leaf. 
The 3d leaf is like 1st, beginning with (ch 4, dc on loop) 5 times 
instead of 8 times.; after joining to opposite side (ch 4, dc on loop) 
5 times, dc on 2d loop from corner, on opposite side, ch 4, dc on 
loop, dc on 1 st loop from corner opposite, ch 4, dc on 2 loops 
together, opposite side, at corner, (ch 3, dc on 2 loops) 13 times; 
this takes to 1st pin, if no mistakes are made in counting. Repeat 
3 times from *, join ends neatly, without breaking thread, 1 k-st, 
as directed previously, dc on 2 loops together (ch 3, dc on 2 loops 
together) 10 times, (ch 1, dc on 2 loops) 10 times, dc on loop (ch 
3, dc on 1 loop) 34 times, (ch 1, dc on 2 loops) 10 times, dc on 
next loop, (ch 3, dc on loop) 41 times, (ch 1, dc on loop) 10 times, 
dc on loop (ch 3, dc on loop) 33 times, (ch r, dc on 2 loops) 11 
times, (ch 3, dc on 2 loops) 10 times. Repeat 3 times, join, 1 tc 
over 1st loop (ch 3, tc over next loop) 10 times, (ch 1, tc over 3d 
loop) 4 times, (ch 3, tc over next loop) 34 times, (ch 1, dc over 3d 
loop) 4 times, and so continue around. 

After joining, make the clover picots as follows : Ch 2, tc in tc, 
ch 3, dc in last tc, ch 4, dc in same place, ch 3, dc in same place, 
ch 2, dc in next tc, and repeat. In the depth between leaves, miss 
a tc so the edge will not be too full, thus : Ch 2, miss 1 tc, tc in 
next tc, make the picot as described. When all complete, sew the 



TATTED SCARF END. 43 

lace neatly to linen square. For the wheels: Ch 12, join; ch 6, 
24 roll sts in ring, join to top of 6 ch, ch 6, tc bet 1st and 2d roll 
sts, ch 3, tc bet next 2 roll sts, repeat around ring, joining to 3d of 
6 ch. Finish with picots as described. Join wheels to picots on 
lace when working, 2 on each side and 3 in centre. To make the 
roll st, put thread over 30 times, and draw thread through. Roll st 
is accurately described in No. 4, page 32. 

Baste on stiff paper, and fill in spaces with wheels in common 
" basket " or weaving st. 

This piece of work is not difficult, and is very attractive. 



TATTED SCARF END. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Bertha G. Trefry, Parrsboro, N.S.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 50, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and tatting shuttle. 

Begin large wheels with a ring of 16 p, separated by 16 dk ; 
around this are 16 tiny rings of 10 dk each (5 dk, join to p of mid- 
dle ring, 5 dk, close), and around these 16 larger rings, made alter- 
nately, and joined to each other by 1st side p : 4 dk, 1 p, 2 dk, 8 p, 
2 dk, 1 p, 4 dk, close ; finishing the large wheel. This is sur- 
rounded by 9 smaller wheels : begin with a ring of 8 p, separated by 
8 dk ; around this, 8 rings of 4 dk, 1 p, 1 dk, 8 p, 1 dk, 1 p, 4 dk ; 
join in making by 1st p, and join the wheels by 5th p of ring on 
each side, and to alternate rings of centre wheel by 5th p in 2d ring 
from side joining. This completes the large wheel, which gives, 
alone, a dainty doily or cushion-cover. These are joined by clover- 
leaf of 4 rings made by 5 dk, 1 p, 1 dk, 8 p, 1 dk, 1 p, 5 dk, joining 
these, as made, in a row, and to the 2 side wheels of large wheel. 
For the heading : a row of wheels, similar to 1st large wheel made, 
save that it is begun with 13 instead of 16 p, the 13 tiny rings are 
of 8 dk, and the threads connecting them with outer rings a little 
shorter. These are joined to the clover-leaf, and to the 2 upper 
small wheels. A double-ring insertion finishes the whole. The 
work is very simple, being all done with one shuttle, and needs little 



44 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



explanation. Care should be taken to make long picots, as the work 
is much handsomer. For the other end of the scarf the work may 
be varied, beginning at the head with a double ring edge, next a row 
of clover-leaves, and another row of the double ring edge, a row of 




Tatted Scarf End. 



wheels, and below these two wheels, then i, to form Vandykes; a 
ciover-leaf of 5 rings between the two wheels missed. The work is 
the same, but differently arranged. Other variations may be had, as 
one fancies, worked out in finer or coarser thread according to the 
use for which designed. No. 30 makes a pretty lambrequin. The 
wheels may be joined to form a cover for sofa-pillow, or used for a 
tidy, with ribbon. For tatted work the Irish flax threads are un- 
surpassed. 



NETTED DOILY. 



45 



NETTED DOILY. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Agnes Riddel, 56 St. Matthews Street, Montreal, P.Q^., Can.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 80, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, for the netting, No. 50 for feather-stitching (or floss, size 5, 
if preferred), meshes of 4 sizes, and netting needle, No. 19. 




Netted Doily. 



Cut a circle of linen 4 inches in diameter, work around with 
needle and thread in buttonhole stitch, 172 stitches; using the $/%- 



46 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

inch mesh, and same needle, make a stitch in each of previous row. 
With the netting needle do 5 rows, using smallest (J^-inch) mesh. 
Do next row with the 2d size (3/6 -inch) mesh, and next with the 3d 
size (i^-inch) mesh, netting the 2d st and then the 1st, thus mak- 
ing a cross-st. Net 3 more rows over the same mesh, then a row 
with the large (J^-inch) mesh, netting 3 sts ki every 3d st of last 
row. Net a row with small mesh, taking up every st, 3 more rows 
with same, 1 row with 3d size mesh, then a row with large mesh, 
netting 6 sts in every 3d st. Next, with 3d size mesh, take up 5 sts, 
then 4, 3, and 2 sts, forming the border. Nothing can be more 
dainty than these little doilies, netted of the lustrous flax thread, and 
patterns may be varied almost indefinitely. 



WIDE ANTIQUE LACE. } 

[Contributed by Mrs. C. A. Stone, Box 257, Holliston, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 60, 3-cord, 200- 
yards spools, 33 pairs bobbins, pattern and lace-desk, with pins. 

Match the pattern around the cylinder or cushion ; having wound 
the bobbins, tie together in pairs, pin 3 pairs in 220, 5 pairs in 137 
and 76, 2 pairs in 63, 102, and 53, 1 pair in 219, 217, 214, 210, 
205, 199, 192, 189, 175, 174, 172, 114, 113, and 101. 

Scallop : (a) Wt 3 2d and 33d, pin in 1, close with wt (b) ; tw 
3 2d twice, (a), etc 3 2d and 33d, pin in 2, close with etc; tw 3 2d 

3 times, repeat (a) to (a) pin in 3; etc to left, using 30th, pin in 

4 ; as the pin is always closed with the same movement that pre- 
cedes it, it will not be mentioned further. Ctc to right, using 32c!, 
tw 3 times, repeat (a) to (a), putting pin in 5 ; ctc to left, using 
29th, pin in 6 ; to right, using 3 2d, tw 3 2d 3 times, lepeat (a) to 
(a), pinning in 7 ; continue in this way, taking on a pair at left each 
time, to. pin 10; after this proceed the same, but dropping a pair 
at left, to pin 18 ; after closing, tw 32d 3 times, wt 32d and 33d, pin 
in 19 (b). Tw 27th to 31st, inclusive, twice. 

Square : Ctc 26th and 27th, pin in 20 ; ctc 25th and 26th, pin in 
21; ctc to right, using 28th pair, pin in 22; to left, using 24th, 



WIDE ANTIQUE LACE, 



47 



pin in 23 ; continue back and forth, taking on a pair each side, 
putting pins in 24, 25, 26, 27, and 28; etc to left, using 23d, pin in 

29, and work back and forth, dropping a pair each side, pinning in 

30, 31, 32, 33, 34, and 35. Tw all pairs used in square once. 




Wide Antique Lace. 



Repeat scallop (b) to (b), pins where designated, the last in 53 ; 
tw 27th to 31st, inclusive, 3 times. 

Oblong figure: Ht 21st and 2 2d, pin in 54; ht 2 2d and 23d, 
pin in 55 ; ht to left, using 20th, pin in 56; to right, using 2 2d, 
pin in 57 ; to left, using 19th, pin in 58 ; continue thus, taking on 
a pair at left and dropping a pair at right, each time, pinning in 59, 
60, 61, 62, and 63. For the tiny blocks in basket or lozenge st 



48 barbour ? s prize needle-work series. 

(1-st) use 2 pairs bobbins; ist block: (a) Pass right bobbin of 
23d pair over left of 24th, under right of 24th, back over right and 
under left bobbin of 24th, over left of 23d, back under left of 23d 
(a), repeat (a) to (a) 4 times, forming the little block carefully, 
which can be easily done with a little practice. Wt 2 2d and 23d, 
pin in 64 j 1-st, using 21st and 22d pairs; wt 20th and 21st, pin 
in 65 ; 1-st, using 19th and 20th pairs; ht 24th and 25th, pin in 
66 ; ht 25th and 26th, pin in 67 ; ht to left, using 23d, pin in 68 ; 
continue, taking on a pair at left and dropping a pair at right, pin- 
ning in 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, and 75 ; tw 17th to 21st, inclusive, 
once. 

Spider: Tw 22d to 26th, inclusive, twice (c) ; etc 26th and 
27th, work to right, using 31st pair; etc 25th and 26th, then to 
right, using 30th; etc 24th and 25th, to right, using 29th; etc 23d 
and 24th, to right, using 28th; etc 22d and 23d, to right, using 
27th (c) ; pin in 76, repeat (c) to (c), tw 2 2d to 31st, inclusive, 3 
times. 

2d square is like ist, beginning with 16th and 17th pairs, pin' 
ning in 77 to 92, inclusive ; tw all pairs used. 

2d oblong : Ht 21st and 2 2d, pin in 93 ; ht 20th and 21st, pin in 
94; ht to right, using 23d pair, pin in 95 ; to left, using 21st, pin 
in 96 (d). Continue ht back and forth, taking on at right and 
dropping at left (d), pinning last in 102 ; 1-st 19th and 20th pairs; 
wt 20th and 2 1 st, pin in 103 ; 1-st 21st and 2 2d, wt 2 2d and 23d, 
pin in 124; 1-st 23d and 24th, ht 18th and 19th, pin in 105; ht 
17th and 18th, pin in 106; repeat (d) to (d), pinning in 114 last. 
Tw 2 2d to 26th, inclusive, once. 

3d oblong is like ist oblong, beginning with nth and 12th pairs, 
putting last pin in 136, bet nth and 12th pairs. Tw 7th to nth, 
inclusive. 

2d spider: Tw 12th to 21st, inclusive, twice, and repeat ist 
spider, using pairs indicated, pin in 137 bet 16th and 17th pairs. 

3d square is like ist, using 6th and 7th pairs to begin, pins in 
138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, and 144. Ctc to left, using ist, pin 
in 145; decrease square as before, last pin in 153 ; tw all pairs 
used. 



WIDE ANTIQUE LACE 



49 



• • .1 

• • • • • . • .2-3 
• # • • • • . .5 

• • • "4 D 


. - • '6 ' 


• • • ~ *0 


m - • • Q 7 


........ ... *b J 


... . • • - . • . -10 


" . . . . . * -21 *22 *I4 -13 


•?3 *24 # ' 6 "15 


• ... • • %ei3 \_ . ,o ._ 


• - 25 28 .. 17 


• "37 28 Iy 


— i -OQ .-.n «ot .37 


• 54 «£i= "30 *3d 0/ 


« .31 .,-, .qfl -39 


•56 "55 * 32 „ ib J , 


* .58 -57 ^ -34*40 "41 


.60 "53 « 6+ "66 .35 "42 "43 


• . . • '62 -61 '68 '67 44 


... • • • ' -77 -63 -65 "70 -69 .46 -+5 
..... . 78V4 .72-71 -48 -47 


. . • * -8D * 81 -74*73 « J 43 

82 « 83 '75 • - 5 3 2 '57 

. . . . • -84 # * 8 ^ '76 # 53 - # 


.'."•*• .||7 II5 .H6' 8 . 6 88 -89 "94 -95^ 




. " . " . .is"" 9 'I3D.I25 -127*92 • l05 -ID3 -98 .99 • 


. . .,23 '12 2 -129 -128 *™ " ia7 8,0 ° • ,0 ' * 


. , |38 ., 24 .l26 -131 .| 3D -108.109 -IDS '102. . 


. . l39 -140 -133 -132 ; • ||D -Hi # ' 


- . I4 -142 ., 35 . l34 . -..2 ">3 • 


.,43 -144.136 # " 4 


.,45 -146 - -137 


. A 1 m\/LQ BI54- * * * * 


• ! 4 ' '140 ,|JT 


.176 .1*9 *I50 #I5S • |56 .« ... . 


.^7 ..so -157 * ,5y • • ... • 


•177 • 5 * l52 if;n 
-185-178.153 -166 -164 - 159 -l6 ° 1 ^ 


.,86-173.167-168 -161 -'62 

•193 -187.180 -169 -i7D # I65 ''^ • " 

.,94-188 .181 -171 '172 • • • 


«iAQ .iA2 "173 .'74 • ... * • - 


•200 -,95 •»03 -lo^ " a # 


,. n _lOQ al"/^ . .."•'."•• * 


•201 «|96 -190 -183 -I/O 


.206 -2D2 -197 - 191 *I84. • •••;'-. 


•2D7 .2.03 "198 .192 • • • * 


_,. .205 .PQ4 .iqq ... ••• *• 


•Pit W C<-*T»IJ} 


.212 .209 -3D5. ..... • ' * 


•215 -213 -2,0 ' * * 


•216 *2l4. • • . . • ... 


•218 *2\7* • • • . • • 


•219 • " * ..." 


.220 . . • • ... 


. 


BARBDUR'5 PRIZE NEEDLE WORK SERIES BDDK ND.6. 



4th oblong is like 2d, beginning with nth and 12th pairs. 
Twisted hole ground: (e) Wt 2d and 3d, pin in 176, do not 



50 harbour's prize needle-work series. 

close, wt ist and 2d, 2d and 3d; ht 3d and 4th, tw each pair once, 
pin in 177, close and twist. Simply remember, in this ground, to 
tw each pair once after each ht. Ht4th and 5th, pin in 178 ; con- 
tinue working to right, as directed (e), putting last pin in 184 ; re- 
peat (e) to (e), working diagonally, 8 times, making 1 hole less 
each row. 

The pattern may be easily followed : in fact, directions are unnec- 
essary after one becomes used to the work. Explicit directions, 
with simple patterns, are given in No. 3 of the Prize Needle-work 
Series, and in " Lace Work : A Handbook Illustrated," with other 
patterns, in No. 4 and No. 5 of the Series. The work is very fasci- 
nating, and little children easily learn it. A corner for almost any 
torchon lace may be turned by this method* which is elaborately de- 
scribed in No 4 : Work up to a diagonal, tie each pair of threads in 
a snug "hard knot," remove all pins to last row, take these care- 
fully from the holes, keeping them in the lace, and pin back to 
opposite diagonal. Extra holes corresponding must be pricked 
through the spiders in each oblong to make it correspond with ist 
diagonal, but these are only used in turning a corner. Tw all pairs 
once, and proceed. Let me say that Barbour's linen is the only 
thread I have found suitable for this work. 



TIDY IN FILET GUIPURE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. H. M. Wiggins, Hempstead, L.I., N.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 50, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, netting needle No. 18, and ^-inch mesh. 

Directions for netting appeared, fully illustrated, in No. 5, hence 
it will not be necessary to repeat, in detail. Make a square of plain 
netting, 80 meshes wide, to allow for cutting away, stretch in a wire 
or wooden frame, and darn in the pattern as illustrated, or choose 
other designs as preferred. The diamonds are darned in "over 
and under," 8 meshes wide, decreasing to 2 meshes. The centre 
is filled with a little wheel, and stalks of guipure in relief are car- 
ried to points and edge between, formed by twisting double threads 



TIDY IN FILET GUIPURE, 



51 



and weaving over and under to cord them. After the darning is all 
completed, the background is filled in with festoon-stitch. Although 




Tidy in Filet Guipure. 



simple, the effect is charming. The edge is buttonholed, and the 
netting cut away from it. For this work Barbour's linen seems 
especially suitable, as it is so lustrous, while possessing the neces- 
sary firmness and smoothness. 



52 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES 



MACRAME HAND-BAG. 

[Contributed by Annie L. Kean, 359 W. Fort Street, Detroit, Mich.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax macrame, 4-ounce balls, satin lining 
and ribbon of same color, pink, or any desired shade, and Barbour's 

patent macrame lace-desk. 

Fasten a horizontal thread doubled 
(all horizontal threads must be doubled) 
across the desk, loop 66 doubled 
threads, each 54 inches long, once 
over it, carry across a second hori- 
zontal thread, turn all working threads 
over this, and divide into 33 groups 
of 4 threads each. * Hold the two 
middle ones, knot 1st thread over 
them once, still holding the middle 
ones, add 4th thread, passing 1st thread 
under (it is only in making these knots 
you pass the thread under first — nearly 
always it goes over), then over the 
threads and through the loop, draw 
tight, and the knot is done. Repeat 
with remaining 65 groups. In 2d row 
the knots come between those above 
them. To accomplish this, begin with 
the 3d thread, divide into groups of 4 
each, and work as directed. The 3d 
row is like 1st. * Fasten on a 3d hori- 
zontal thread, and turn all over it. 
Divide the 132 threads into 11 groups 
of 12 each, hold 1st over 5 following, 
turn or knot them over it to form the 
"rib," repeat 3 times; then hold 12th 
Macrame Hand-bag. thread over S preceding it, and work 

in same manner. Having completed 
upper part of figure, make the raised " button " as follows : Take 




MACRAME HAND-BAG. 53 

4 centre threads of the group, hold last 3 firmly, and knot 1st over 
them, hold 1st 3, and knot 4th over them; repeat 3 times, knot- 
ting alternately 1st and 4th threads, resulting in a narrow knotted 
piece. Take the 2d of the 4 threads, draw up and over preceding 
5, knot over, repeat 3 times ; take 3d of centre threads, draw up 
and over the following 5, knot them over it, repeat 3 times, and the 
figure is complete ; repeat 10 times, then knot again over 4th hori- 
zontal thread, repeat insertion above, knot over a 5th horizontal 
thread, take 1st 3 threads, knot 4th over them once, hold last 3, knot 
1 st over them once, repeat 9 times ; miss every alternate 4 threads, 
as these are covered by the ribbon. Knot all over 6th horizontal 
thread, divide into groups of 4 threads, and repeat from * to *. 
Gather threads into a tassel and tie with ribbon, joining the ends of 
the horizontal threads neatly. 

This is a very handsome design for a lambrequin, which may be 
made wider by repeating the row of figures and insertion. In the 
flax macrame it is very rich-looking. The same design may be util- 
ized for a whisk-broom holder or slipper-case. In finer thread, it is 
a handsome finish for a towel- sham or a bureau scarf. 



DARNED NET LACE AND INSERTION. 

[Contributed by Estella Ball, Talmage, Kansas.] 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 35, ecru, 3-cord, 200- 
yards spools, and Brussells net of medium-size mesh. 

Baste the net firmly to a piece of stiff colored paper, or, better 
still, black oilcloth. Or, as some prefer, the design may be traced 
on stiff paper, the net basted over this, and the darning done by the 
traced lines. It will be noticed that this pattern is different from 
many others, much of it being double ; that is, the thread is run out 
one row of holes and back the same row, thus making the work 
more close. For the edge, run a thread along first, then buttonhole 
over it, and cut out, as embroidery. 

Darned net is coming more and more into feminine favor, not 
only for personal wear, but for scarfs, curtains, bedspreads, etc. 



54 



BARBOUR'S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



This pattern is suited to nearly every purpose, while especially 
designed for an apron. The Ulster etching flax, white or ecru, may 




Darned Net Lace and Insertion. 



be used instead of the thread if preferred, and has, of course a 
richer effect. The work is durable, wearing as long as the muslin 
with which it is used, and is not at all trying or tedious. 



DRAWN-WORK DOILIES, 



55 



DRAWN-WORK DOILIES. 

[Contributed by Mrs. E. Williams, Gorin, Mo.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 70, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, linen embroidery floss, size 5, and square of linen 10 x 10 
inches for each doily. 



ilSiitait 



WiWiWiWtW>WiWtWiWtWiWJJJiWMMi r iTiWflW 



-uriQiiuMt'!:;;;^;;;"..;!!, 

".3^ zwAvrdZ"* ? r 4yi?<-~ ........ 

i£MS*8ff9^*Q&afffe5::::::;" 

;« !!"<**. i»"^i?»j«^c»aj"a»v ■■■■•.■ 



rsi'A'.ifii,.: 



BAHBDUH'S PRIZE NEEDIIE WQHK SEHIES BOOK NO-6. 



Palm-leaf Doily. 



This work is in what is called " Spanish point," differing from the 
ordinary drawn-work. One may easily originate designs. Cut a 
paper pattern of the palm-leaf, mark a circle in the centre of the 
doily, and mark the palm-leaf pattern around this. With needle and 
thread run around the figures twice, then buttonhole-stitch with the 
floss around each. Inside the leaves, draw 3 threads and leave 
3, forming little squares, and work over these with the linen thread, 
back and forth. In the centre draw out more threads, forming larger 
squares, and carry threads across diagonally, weaving wheels in open 
spaces. Detailed description seems unnecessary for such work. 



56 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



iii]jjiiiiiiij!iiiiiiiiiiiiii]iiiiiiiiii]iiii]i)iJiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniui| 






::::•" Ai ii» *•' M'iPi 'M i *%\ % « «,'■', 



♦ v 

Vi 







Butterfly Doilv. 



To hemstitch the edge, draw 10 threads 2 inches from the edge. 
The Irish flax thread, No. 50, is very nice to use for buttonholing 
the figures, instead of the floss, and launders beautifully. 



ROUND TRAY-COVER. 

[Contributed by Miss Christine Hansen, SchonbergsgadeXo. 12, Copenhagen, Denmark.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, white, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, No. 50 and No. 60, Barbour's linen embroidery floss, size 2, 
and square of linen 12X12 inches. 

Mark a circle as large as convenient on the square, and trace the 
pattern. Go around the lines with needle and thread, taking short 
running stitches, then cut through the centre of each figure and out 
to the edge until the linen may be turned back on the wrong side 
to the run. Buttonhole over both edges, using the No. 60 thread, 
fill in the spaces with lace-stitches, such as are used in Battenburg 
lace, and embroider the leaf-sprays with the floss. Buttonhole 



ROUND TRAY-COVER. 



57 



around the edge, turning the linen over as directed, and edge with 
Hedeboe lace. Use the No. 50 thread for the lace-stitches and 
border. Wind thread 5 times around a smooth stick 5/ 8 inch in 
diameter, slip off, and cover not too closely with buttonhole- 
stitches. In the ring, buttonhole to a point, beginning with 5 sts, 
and decreasing each row back and forth. Having made a sufficient 
number of the rings, catch together with needle and thread, and 




Round Tray-cover. 



work around the outer edge with what is known as "Point 
d'Espagne," making picots by tiny buttonhole points, or by turning 
thread over needle as in Raleigh bars, with picots. 



58 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



SCARF IN DANISH ANTIQUE EMBROIDERY. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Betty Petersen, Hellig Andersvej Xo. 44, Slagelse, Denmark.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, Nos. 25, 40, 60, and 100, 
linen floss, size 2, and strip of linen 1^ yards long. 

Draw threads and hemstitch the linen, using No. 100 thread. It 
is better to do this after the embroidery is completed. Trace the 




BRRBdUR'S PRIZE NEEDLE WORK SE 



Scarf in Danish Antique Embroidery. 



figures, run, cut, and buttonhole them, using No. 60 thread, and fill 
with the lace-stitches, any that are desired. Embroider the sprays 
in plain satin stitch with Barbour's No. 2 linen floss. It is more 



SCARF IN DANISH ANTIQUE EMBROIDERY 



59 



beautiful than silk, and is all the whiter and more lustrous for 
washing. 

For the ends of scarf make the Hedeboe lace, using Nos. 25 and 
40 thread. Make plain rings by winding thread 5 or 6 times over a 




End of Scarf. 



stick y± inch in diameter, and buttonholing. The centre ring is 
wound over a stick 1 J^ inch in diameter, buttonholed, and sur- 
rounded with close points of buttonhole stitch. It is a good plan 
to baste the rings after joining on a piece of a stiff paper, filling in 
with lace-stitches as shown. These are of the simplest description. 
When completed, press all with a damp cloth over. Barbour's 
thread is used for this work, and well liked everywhere. 

One may very easily originate patterns of the Hedeboe lace r and 
the effect is always rich and striking. 



60 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



TEA-CLOTH IN DANISH ANTIQUE EMBROIDERY. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Betty Petersen, Lovegaard Slagelse, Denmark.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. ioo, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, No. 50 and No. 70, 3-cord, either spools or skeins, sewing- 
needle sufficiently large for the thread, and a yard square of linen 
sheeting. 




Tea-cloth in Danish Antique Embroidery. 



Make a hem ij4 inches wide, hemstitching with the No. 100 
thread. Having the pattern stamped or transferred, proceed as 



CENTRE-PIECE, WITH MALTESE BRAID. 61 

described in making the " Antique Square," on page 84, No. 5 of 
the Prize Needle-work Series. With needle and thread make a run 
on the stamped line, cut through centre, nearly out to run, fold linen 
smoothly back to the run, and buttonhole over both edges. This 
makes the work firm, and is more quickly accomplished, besides leav- 
ing no frayed threads. The spaces are filled in with different lace- 
stitches, any that one likes. The sprays are worked in simple satin 
stitch, using the No. 70 thread. The rings for Hedeboe lace, to finish 
edge, are made, also, as described in No. 5, winding thread No. 50 
around smooth stick $/% inch in diameter 10 times, and buttonholing 
over neatly, but not so close as to make the ring wiry, working back 
and forth to form the point, filling the rings with the web or wheel 
stitch, joining 8 to form a circle, with points all inside, and twisting 
thread from one to another as in forming wheel stitch. The circles 
are joined together, 2 rings to 2 rings, and to the cloth by 2 rings 
on each, save at the corner. The spaces are filled by carrying 
twisted threads from each ring to a single point in cloth, weaving 
over them a half-spider. This work is rapidly executed, and every- 
where popular, as, in fact, is all linen embroidery at the present time. 



CENTRE-PIECE, WITH MALTESE BRAID. 

[Contributed by Mrs. R. A. Hawkins, Okolona, Miss.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 120, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, 3 shades delft blue Barbour's etching flax, 4 skeins No. 153, 
and 2 skeins each of No. 151 and No. 152, steel crochet hook, size 
000, square of linen 16X16 inches, and £-inch pin or staple. 

One spool of the thread will suffice for 4% yards of braid, which 
is all that is required. Directions for making are given on page 31, 
No. 4 of the Prize Series, and on page 26, No. 5. Make a loop in 
thread, put it on prong of pin, holding prong down so the work will 
slip off easily, turn pin over, make 2 dc on thread, * turn, miss 1st 
dc, make 1 dc in 2d dc, also 1 dc in under top thread of last loop, 
repeat from * to length required. Make a chain on both sides of 
braid, catching 1 loop of braid in every 2d chain-stitch. Carefully 



62 



barbour's prize needle-work series. 



baste braid on pattern, following directions given for Battenburg 
work, whipping the edges to make the braid curve. Fill in spaces 
with wheels or spiders, or any stitch preferred, using No. 120 or 150 
of the thread, according to taste, remove lace, baste on centre of 




Centre-piece, with Maltese Braid. 



linen square, right side up, taking care the corners are true, button- 
hole around outer edge of lace with shade No. 152, sewing through 
the linen, and around inner edge with shade No. 15 1 j work scallop 
with shade No. 153. The little bow-knots are done in outline with 
shade No. 152, and the stars where the braid crosses with shades 



CHRYSANTHEMUM CENTRE-PIECE. 63 

No. 151 and No. 152. When finished, remove all basting threads, 
cut away the linen carefully from beneath lace and around scallop, 
and press between two cloths, on wrong side. 

This application of the braid gives a beautiful effect ; it is also 
far more durable than the ordinary braids used for such purposes, as 
it will outwear the linen centre itself, and washing does not injure 
it, but on the contrary adds to its silken appearance. The pattern 
is simple, but showy. The use of maltese braid in this way may be 
carried out almost indefinitely. A very handsome bureau scarf 
might be made of light blue (or other color) art linen, with a design 
in ecru braid, made of No. 50, Barbour's crochet and lace thread, 
in balls, deep ecru, using inch pin. 



CHRSYANTHEMUM CENTRE-PIECE. 

[Contributed by Miss Phebe E. Harkey, New Holland, Pa.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster etching flax, size 4, 1 skein each of 
No. 2 and No. 3, 2 skeins each of No. 6 and No. 42, and 3 skeins 
No. 41, with piece of art linen 15 x 18 inches. 

Stamp or mark the design on the linen. The chrysanthemums 
are worked in " Janina " stitch, with shades No. 42, No. 6, No. 2, 
and No. 3. Commence at point of petal, shading with different 
numbers. This stitch is very effective in this class of work. There 
are two methods of making it. One is done in this way : Bring the 
needle up at point of petal, carry the thread down across petal to 
right, putting needle through to wrong side, bring needle across 
petal and up on left side, then up to right of point, across to 
left at top, then down to right again, and across on wrong side, up 
to right, across, and so on, the stitches or threads on the right side 
crossing each other. It is very simple. In another manner the 
stitch is worked altogether on the surface, save a very short back- 
stitch along the outline on each side, the needle being inserted at 
next to last thread and pushed through to outside again below the 
last thread, then across to other side of petal. In filling large 
leaves this stitch is very useful worked not so closely. In this way, 



64 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



it is like a broad cross-stitch, and with the stitches taken farther 
apart it does not give the effect of a vein down the middle of petal. 
This is the stitch used in the table cover, page 96, No. 4, and is 




Chrysanthemum Centre-piece. 



very effective with little work, especially so in filling long and 
rather narrow petals, leaves, or figures. 

The stems are in outline, and the scallop in ordinary buttonhole 
stitch, using shade 41. I desire to recommend Barbour's linen 
flosses for all work of this kind, especially on linen. They are as 
effective as silk, and launder and wear much better. 



SOFA PILLOW. 



65 



SOFA PILLOW. 

Materials : Ulster rope linen floss, 3 skeins each of shade 3, shade 
20, 1 skein of shade 1, and a square of tan-color denim. 

This is a simple but very striking design. Use shades No. 3 and 
No. 20 for the featherstitching, and shade No. 1 for outlining the 




centre, and for the French knots. Any colors liked may be chosen. 
Two shades of green on a terra-cotta ground with shade 1 for the 
centre would be effective ; or two shades of terra-cotta, on green, 
with shade No. 42 for the centre. The design may also be devel- 
oped in three shades of delft blue, on a gray linen crash. 



66 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



CENTRE-PIECE IN CORONATION WORK. 

[Contributed by Mrs. E. M. Love, Rome, Wis.] 

Materials : 8 skeins Ulster etching flax, white, 3 skeins No. 152, 
a piece of coronation braid, and square of linen 13X13 inches. 

The design is followed with the braid, the space between the 
outlining being filled in with the No. 152 floss in any fancy stitch, 
lattice or coral stitch is desirable, or Jhe stars and "jewels " used in 
the model. The edge is buttonholed with the white floss, and edged 




Centre-piece in Coronation Work. 



with the coronation braid. Any color of floss may be chosen that 
is preferred. It has all the lustre of silk, and washes admirably. 

This pattern may be readily enlarged for other uses. It is also 
adapted to Battenburg work. If preferred, an outline of the Ulster 
rope linen floss, in knot-stitch, may be substituted for the braid. 



SOFA PILLOW IN CROSS-STITCH 



67 



SOFA PILLOW IN CROSS-STITCH. 

[Contributed by E. M. Fos,s, 2 Hamilton Place, Boston, Mass.] 

Materials : Ulster rope linen floss, 2 skeins shade No. 43 (black), 
2 of No. 5, 3 of No. 53, and 5 skeins each of No. 20 and No. 122, 
with a square of Berlin canvas or basket cloth. 



/SOTES^^KZS^SSBBSSS^S?! 







iJ r»*tfv£l UP'' -\ 



ffold 



ttl • 48 



i'S^SHl #1^ 







ftc« I 




Sofa Pillow in Cross-stitch, 



It is not possible to show the beauty of this work properly in a 
plain engraving. The figures are outlined with black. It will be 
difficult not to get a good effect in the use of these flosses, as the 
colorings are soft and rich, and the lustre excellent. A little study 
of the cross-stitch piece in color will aid in the production of other 
artistic work. 



68 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



RUSSIAN LACE AND INSERTION. 

[Contributed by Julia D. Smith, Box 159, West Medvvay, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 25 and No. 40, 3-cord, 
200-yards spools, with 6 yards new Ulster braid. This will be suffi- 
cient for one yard of lace. 




Russian Lace and Insertion. 



Stiffen the pattern and sew the braid carefully on it. Where the 
braid curves, press it in place till it fits the pattern easily. Make 
the twisted bars and rings of No. 25, the filling stitches with No. 40. 
The rings are made by winding thread over a smooth stitch 7 or 8 



CROSS-STITCH SQUARE, 



69 



times, and buttonholing closely ; large rings are z / 2 inch, before 
buttonholing ; next size, ^ inch ; and smallest are J^ inch. Any 
stitches preferred may be used. Each leaf-section may have a ring, 
with simple twisted bars, if desired ; in any case the effect is rich 
and handsome. 

CROSS-STITCH SQUARE. 

[Contributed by Miss Ellen Muller, Box 4, 95 Western Boulevard, New York, N.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster rope linen floss, 3 skeins each of 
shades Nos. 152 and 154, 4 skeins No. 122, 2 skeins each Nos. 3, 20, 
and 112, and 24-inch square of basket-cloth or denim. 



1 



T SKI 



> ?.*:»-.w=.~--». p;:i.«i' ; >;".' • 












ISISS^ 



... :sj; 

■eeeaai 



. > a - .' •• ... •. ;,-..' vr- : 1 .* * •- 

. ►.»♦' .< .! *'. .♦ • '« :, -« .-« -. • • . , .-. _. . 



..'.a?. ,;i35s.«»--t 






..:■■:■: •:■•:<: •. ;- 



v:;;^ 








lite, 






mm? w ' 



IZE NEEDLE WORK SERIES BDDK ND.6. 










":■•" 



Cross-stitch Square. 



70 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

In this case the light shade of blue is used for the outside row of 
cross-stitching in corner, side and small centre figures, the darker 
blue being filled in. Shade 112 (pink) is used for outlining por- 
tions of these figures, also for the four diagonal bars in centre, filled 
in with No. 122 (poppy scarlet), while No. 3 is used for outlining 
the centre figure, the curved figures over the bars, and the " wings " 
of the side figures, filled in with sh'ade 20. Any colors liked may, 
of course, be chosen, but it must be remembered that for this work 
the Ulster rope linen floss is fir superior to any other material. 

This square may be used for sofa pillow or cover for small table ; 
in fact, the design may be adapted to many purposes, corners for 
table-covers, borders for portieres, etc., etc. 



ROYAL BATTENBURG CENTRE-PIECE. 

[Contributed by Ella Bottorff, Cordon, Indiana.] 

Materials : Three spools Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. ico, 
white, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, 18 yards hemstitch braid, rather 
fine, J^-inch wide, 5 yards Battenburg purling, and sewing needle 
large enough to carry thread nicely. 

Follow general directions heretofore given for basting braid on 
designs. The rings which form the centre of flowers in this design 
are made by winding thread around a small pencil 12 times, and 
working over in close buttonhole stitch. 

The following stitches are used in the piece given : Point de 
Venise and buttonholed bars in the leaves, the flower-petals com- 
posed of point d'Alencon and point d'Angleterre, the groundwork 
of Raleigh bars with picots, and the centre is filled with " butter- 
flies " and " roses " in weaving stitch, similar to that used in drawn 
work. One need not be confined to these stitches, however, choos- 
ing those which seem most effective. It seems unnecessary to give 
detailed directions for working these stitches, as they are all so 



ROYAL BATTENBURG CENTRE-PIECE, 



71 



fully described, with many others, in No. 5 of the Prize Needle- 
work Series. If preferred, a linen centre may be inserted in place 
of the worked centre, which, however, is novel and most effective, 
well repaying the extra labor. As shown, it forms a very handsome 
cover for a sofa pillow. 




Royal Battenburg Centre-piece. 



After work is completed, it may be released from pattern, pinned 
securely to a folded cloth, and pressed with hot iron over damp 
cloth until dry. The design may be enlarged easily, and made 
with heavier braid, if desired. 



72 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



ROUND CENTRE-PIECE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Hedvig Muller, 12 104th Street, New York, N.Y.] 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 35, 3 -cord, 200-yards 
spools, 12 yards new Ulster braid, and circle of linen 8 inches in 
diameter. 

Proceed as has been directed in many previous articles on this 
work, which requires little or no description when so well illustrated 
as in the Prize Needle-work Series. If wanted larger, a centre-piece 







Round Centre-piece. 

of this style may be easily changed, as the border is formed of 
single figures. A circle 1 7 inches in diameter is surrounded by 
13 figures, making a centre-piece nearly one yard in diameter. 



SOFA PILLOW. 



73 




Sofa Pillow. 



SOFA PILLOW. 

[Contributed by Mrs. E. H. Stratton, Medway, Mass.] 

Materials : Ulster rope linen floss, 6 skeins shade No. 60, 3 skeins 
shade No. 41, and square of tan-colored denim. 

Use No. 60 for outlining, as shown. A knotted outline stitch is 
employed, which gives the effect of " coronation " braid, but is much 
richer. A plain outline or chain-stitching is also very effective. No. 
41 is used for filling in the petals, and the effect is very lovely. 



74 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



BOLERO JACKET, IN RENAISSANCE WORK. 

[Contributed by Emma C. Monroe, Roxbury, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, 
i spool No. 100 for whipping curves, 1 spool No. 70 for filling- 
stitches, and 2 spools No. 40 for bars and wheels. The Ulster etch- 
ing flax is very rich for the latter purpose. 

The bars are of twisted threads : Fasten in at a point, carry to 
another, then to another and another, filling the required space ; then 
turn and twist back over the first threads, catching in same places. It 
is quickly and easily done. Carry thread across space to be filled by 




Bolero Jacket. 



a wheel, twist back to cencre, to edge, back to centre, etc., weave 
the wheel over and under these bars, and twist out 1st thread. The 
leaves are filled with a fine herring-bone stitch, catching in every 2d 
or 3d picot of braid. 



POINT LACE HANDKERCHIEFS 



75 



POINT LACE HANDKERCHIEFS. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Hedvig Muller, Box 4, 95 Western Boulevard, New York, N.Y.] 

Materials for No. i : Barbour's lace thread No. 150, 9 yards 
plain point lace braid, 2^2 yards purling, and 6 y 2 -inch square of 
fine linen lawn, for centre. 




Point Lace Handkerchief. 



Materials for No. 2 : Barbour's lace thread, No. 150, 12 yards 
lace braid, 3 yards purling, and 7 -inch square linen lawn. 



76 



barbour's prize needle-work series. 




Point Lace Handkerchief. 



Directions for this work, in detail, are unnecessary. Having 
stiffened the pattern by basting at the back a piece of heavy wrap- 
ping paper, holland, or similar material, follow the outlines carefully 
by sewing the braid on them. For this purpose No. ioo of the 
Irish flax thread is very nice, being so smooth and strong. The 
stitches illustrated may be varied indefinitely, and need not be 
described. 



STRAWBERRY CENTRE-PIECE. 



77 




Strawberry Centre-piece. 



STRAWBERRY CENTRE-PIECE. 

[Contributed by Miss Elise Jungbluth, Beverly Plantation, Beaufort, S.C.] 

Materials : Barbour's etching flax, size 4, 3 skeins each shade No. 
no, 122, 2 skeins each No. 41 and 80, 1 skein each No. 130, 131, 
and 6, 4 skeins No. 121, 5 skeins No. 21,6 skeins No. 20^, and 
3 skeins flossette, size ****, with % yard " Gobelin cloth," or other 
suitable material. 



78 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

Leaves are worked with long and short stitch, veins and stems out- 
lined with No. 2 1, and sepals with 20^. The half under leaves are 
worked with shade 21. Flowers : Sepals are first worked with 20^, 
petals of flossette, long and short switch, stamens a long stitch of No. 
41, the seeds (French knots) of shade 6 ; spent blooms are worked 
in the same way. Largest strawberries worked with shade 121, then 
fill in heavily with shade 122. Some berries may be worked nearly 
all with shade 122. For medium-sized berries, use shade no at 
top or side, 121 at bottom and side; in the shadow use deepest 
shade, 122. After berries are completed, use 131 for seeds, merely 
placing a short stitch here and there to represent these. The 
smaller berries are to be worked with no and 121, using a few 
stitches of 122 at side and bottom. The smallest berries are of 80, 
with just a stitch here and there of no, seed of 130, and bottom of 
20^ . Avoid shading the berries alike, as the more irregularly they 
are shaded the handsomer the fruit will look. The outer edge of 
the mat is buttonholed, one long stitch, then a short one, with 
flossette. After buttonholing, shade in lightly with 41. This har- 
monizes better with the bright shades, and relieves the bareness pre- 
sented by white buttonholing. 

It would seem impossible to show by illustration the beauty of this 
piece, even with the aid of color. The Ulster etching flax gives a 
rich, heavy effect most difficult to obtain by use of other material. 
Embroidery is also rapidly accomplished with it, and it must cer- 
tainly become popular with ladies who desire handsome pieces of 
work with as little expenditure of time and labor as possible. 
Another consideration strongly in its favor, and which will be ap- 
preciated by every one, is that it does not wear rough, but retains its 
lustre and smoothness, spreading to cover more rather than less. 
This fact is probably one great reason why the Ulster rope linen 
floss is so well liked for embroidery on articles of household use. 
The latter has the same range of shades as the etching flax. For 
the cross-stitch style of embroidery, which is again in high favor and 
being applied to every sort of material, nothing can equal these 
flosses ; while for conventional designs, the decoration of sofa pillows, 
portieres, table covers, etc., their superiority is unquestioned. 



TEA COSY, 



79 



TEA COSY. 

[Contributed by Lillie S. Coombs, Dartmouth, N.S.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 70, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, piece of fine linen, 14 x 22 inches, i 1 /^ yards silk, ^ yard 
wide. Two spools of the thread are required. 

Make the cosy itself (size 13^ x 18 inches) of cotton batting or 
down, if preferred, covering inside and out with white muslin. Then 
cover with the silk, shirring on the outside, and line smoothly. Cut 




Tea Cosy. 



the linen in two ; draw or stamp on each piece the fleur-de-lis 
design, from base to point of top n inches, and extreme width 12 
inches. Inside line drawn mark the circles, fy inch in diameter, 
marking a smaller circle inside each. Draw the design in centre, 
work all in buttonhole stitch, with the veins of leaves in chain and 



80 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

outline stitches, the centres of flowers in satin stitch. Cut out the 
linen between the circles and work in centre, except the diamond- 
shaped piece in lower part. Baste the work, wrong side up, on stiff 
paper, fill the circles with wheels, and work the ground with loose 
buttonhole stitch. When all is finished, cut the linen from outside 
edge and apply to the cosy. This piece of work is entirely original, 
very easily done, and especially dainty. Nile-green silk was used, 
although other colors may be chosen if preferred. The Danish 
antique embroidery is very effective for use in this way, as is also a 
'suitable design in the new Ulster braid, or in Battenburg. 

Still another charming variation would be in the "Hedeboe" 
lace-work. No. 50 of Barbour's Irish flax thread would be a good 
size. Make the rings by winding thread around a smooth stick 
several times, and buttonhole around. A quantity of these rings 
may be made as occasion offers, in readiness for use. Any design 
that is liked may be easily arranged with them, joined with needle 
and thread, and filled in with lace bars and stitches. Such a design 
may be nearly all of crochet work, if desired. A very pretty cosy 
has a lacing of cord back and forth across the puff of silk, catching 
the cord in small rings on the sides • and a less elaborate but ser- 
viceable one has a cover of linen, decorated in outline with Ulster 
etching flax in some suitable design. On one side may be a teacup 
and saucer, with the words, in quaint lettering, " The cup that 
cheers." Or one may choose something like the following, illus- 
trating the rhyme by a rose or spray of flowers instead of the word 
"posy," and a steaming teacup or teapot where the word "tea" 
occurs : 

" Hot, and fragrant as a posy, 
Find your tea within this cosy." 

One line should be used on each side. The flower may be in 
natural colors, and the letters in one shade or a variety. Worked 
out in the delft blue shades, outline embroidery for this purpose 
would be especially pleasing. Cross-stitch embroidery might be 
substituted for outline, or for the lettering alone, with charming 
effect. 



HANDKERCHIEF IN DUCHESS LACE, 



81 



HANDKERCHIEF IN DUCHESS LACE. 

[Contributed by Miss Jessie D. Roedel, 441 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax lace thread, No. 250, 2 -cord, 200- 
yards spools, 7 yards plain point lace braid, \ T / 2 yards honiton me- 
dallion, 3 yards purling, and 10-inch square linen lawn for centre. 




Handkerchief in Duchess Lace. 



Detailed description of this work seems quite unnecessary, as the 
general directions have been so many times given. The handker- 
chief, as shown, is an exact copy of a beautiful imported one, of 
real Duchess lace, and may be easily and quickly made. Any 
filling-stitches desired may be employed. 



82 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



SCARF IN BATTENBURG LACE. 

[Contributed by Miss Mary Stringer, 3^3 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, N.Y.] 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, 3 .cord, 200-yards spools, 
2 spools No. 40, white, and 1 spool No. 150, for whipping curves, 
34 yards linen hemstitched braid, and }i yard linen a yard wide. 

The rings are made by winding thread around a pencil or small 
stick 15 times and filling with buttonhole stitches, removing from stick 
after first 2 stitches. The straight rows of braid are connected by 
herringbone stitches. Having used Barbour's Irish flax threads for 
point and Battenburg lace, I find them superior to all others, and 
cannot say enough in their praise. 



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Scarf in Battenburg Lace. 



HUCKABUCK SOFA PILLOW 




Huckabuck Sofa Pillow. 



HUCKABUCK SOFA PILLOW. 

[Contributed by Annie Inglis Scott, Paterson, N.J.] 

Materials : Ten skeins Ulster rope linen floss, No. 3, 1 skein No. 
40, and 2 squares of linen huckabuck. 

Having the design marked or stamped, proceed to darn the entire 
surface of the cloth, passing the needle under the small raised stitches 
in the fabric. Carry the needle under the stamped pattern, leaving 
this white to be outlined with the white floss, the centre filled in with 
French knots of the same. 



84 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



CENTRE-PIECE IN BATTENBURG LACE. 

[Contributed by Miss Laura Edwards, 3624 Dodge Street, Omaha, Neb.] 

Materials : Two spools Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 60, 7 yards 
braid, No. 21, 3 dozen small rings, 8 ^-inch rings, and 1 3^ -inch 
ring, with pattern traced on sarcenet cambric. 




Centre-piece in Battenburg Lace. 



The small rings are made by winding thread around a lead pen- 
cil 10 times and buttonholing over, or dc over, if preferred, until 
full. Larger rings are made in the same way, using a stick ^ inch 
and y inch in diameter. The stitches are so clearly illustrated as 
to require no description. 



SQUARE WITH BATTENBURG LACE. 85 

SQUARE WITH BATTENBURG LACE. 

[Contributed by Jessie D. Roedel, 441 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa.] 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, i spool No. 150, 2 spools 
No. 100, and 3 spools No. 80, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, 30 yards 
hemstitched braid, and linen 16 x 16 inches. 

Draw threads an inch from edge, and use No. 150 thread for 
hemstitching. Sew braid to pattern, whipping curves with No. 150 
thread. Though the stitches are simple, a somewhat explicit de- 
scription will be of benefit to beginners. The groundwork is of 
Venetian bars, made with No. 100 thread. These are formed by 
passing the thread from point to point, the threads being covered 
with close buttonhole stitch. This network is arranged according to 
space it is to fill. The writer has seen the crochet chain-stitch, with 
No. 100 flax thread and fine hook, made to imitate these bars, and 
also worked over with " dc " instead of buttonhole. The corner 
petal is in "pyramid" stitch: Beginning at point, make a loop 
across, under this 5 close buttonhole stitches (with one to fasten 
in edge of braid), then from left to right, 4 stitches between 5, 
again 3 between 4, 2 between 3, completing the point, and leaving 
straight threads on each side • then buttonhole stitch in point, 
and in opposite side, 5 stitches under each loop, and so on. 
The point d'Angleterre wheels above this petal are made by 
carrying the thread straight across the space to form squares, about 
y 2 inch, then diagonally across these, to intersect them. With 
the 4th thread (diagonal), carried to the intersection, weave a little 
wheel over and under the 7 threads, slip the needle under it, and 
carry to point for next wheel. The little circle above is filled 
with point d'Anvers bars : Carry a thread across, make 2 buttonhole 
stitches, back to starting point, weave over and under the 2 threads 
to centre, carrying thread out and back to centre, weave as before, 
then pass needle neatly along the back of this spoke to centre, and 
repeat, fastening all securely. The petals on each side the point are 
filled with twisted or Sorrento bars : Fasten in at top of petal, carry 
thread to point, and twist back, twice ; then carry thread to side 
slantingly, at intervals of ys inch, twisting back to centre and fasten- 



86 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERJES. 



ing with a knot. The leaves on each side of these are filled with 
plain Point de Bruxelles : Make a row of loose buttonhole stitches, 
y% inch between, leaving a loop in which are to be worked 2 close 




Square with Battenburg Lace. 



stitches with loop between, next row. Long, narrow spaces are filled 
with herringbone stitch : Fasten in at one side, carry from right to 
left, slightly slanting the stitch, to opposite side, under edge of braid, 
out over previous thread, to opposite side, and so on ; made with 
wider space between there may be 2 rows intersecting and then a 
thread carried through the middle with buttonhole stitch at each in- 
tersection. This variation is shown in several smaller petals. 



RENAISSANCE LACE. 87 



RENAISSANCE LACE. 



In reply to many inquiries : " Old English Point " and " Royal 
Battenburg " are practically the same (the latter being a name given 
the lace by a New York lady), although the Battenburg is frequently 
not so elaborately carried out as the former. Renaissance lace is 
yet lighter, or more " sketchy," if we may use the term, the stitches 
being mainly of the simplest description, " point d'Alencon" bars, 
" herringbone " stitch, and " point d'Angleterre " wheels. For point 
lace proper, plain braid of fine quality is used, with Barbour's Irish 
flax thread No. 150 or No. 250, as preferred, and for Duchess, 
" Princess," and " Honiton " lace, the pattern is a combination of 
the straight braids with the Honiton medallions, using also the finer 
flax threads. " Russian Lace " is produced by the new Ulster braid, 
and is most effective, particularly in heavy pieces of work. No. 25 
thread is not too coarse for this, and the work is especially rich. 
Nos. 30 to 60 are used for the heavier Renaissance and Battenburg 
laces, and for finer grades Nos. 60 to 120, the latter being very 
serviceable for whipping curves in any work of this kind where a 
fine, strong thread is required. The best lace-makers assert that 
Barbour's Irish flax threads are superior to any domestic or imported 
product for this purpose. 

It is sometimes remarked that " any woman who can make a 
buttonhole " may become expert in the production of these laces. 
This seems quite true. Suitable thread and braid being chosen, 
care and practice are alone needed to insure fine work, as the 
beauty of the lace depends in great measure on the evenness of 
the stitches. The work is especially pleasing from the fact that one 
is not confined to any stitch, but may select or invent such as are 
liked. 

Some very pretty examples of Renaissance lace-work are presented 
herewith, and reference is made to the charming bolero jacket, 
illustrated on another page. The stitches in all are practically the 
same — the bars of twisted threads, with wheels, and the " filling " 
of herringbone stitch. For the former, in doilies and centre-piece, 
use No. 35, for the latter No. 50, of Barbour's Irish flax thread. The 



88 



barbour's prize needle-work series. 



rings in the square doily are one-half inch in diameter. For the rose 
doily 5 yards of braid are required, for the square doily 6 yards, and 




Renaissance Centre-piece. 



for the centre-piece io yards. The smaller pieces may be used as 
cushion covers, and ho more acceptable gift could be prepared than 
either. One may be finished almost at a sitting, and by the use of 
the threads designated will be found more satisfactory in every way 
than the imported work, which is nearly or quite all of the Renais- 
sance variety. No learner who essays first a simple design can fail of 



RENAISSANCE LACE. 89 

attaining excellent results. By substituting narrower and finer braid 
a more lace-like effect is had. 

Some general directions for this work are appended, in response 
to many requests. The pattern, which may be used many times, 
with care, is stamped or traced upon paper cambric, or other mate- 
rial having a highly glazed surface, not easily penetrated by the 
needle. This pattern is stiffened by basting upon heavy manila 




Rennissance Doily. 

paper ; some ladies work so lightly that this is not necessary, but 
may be advised as a rule. Now proceed to braid the pattern, using 
stitches fine enough to hold firmly, say }i to % inch. Many teachers 
advocate sewing in the middle of the braid, and this method is 
illustrated in nearly all books on this subject; the writer, however, 
has found it much better to baste near the outer edge, the inner full 
edge being then easily whipped into exact outline. Slanting stitches 
taken across may be advantageously used for narrow braids, pre- 
venting turning up or spreading of edges. Rings are also basted to 
the pattern, all of these stitches being cut at the back, when the 



90 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



work is completed, and drawn out. To commence work neatly, 
make a tiny knot in the thread, and run the needle along centre of 
braid for a few fine stitches ; to fasten off, make a close buttonhole 
stitch, iun along the braid a few stitches, and back, cutting the thread 
close, with sharp scissors. The braid should be joined no oftener 
than necessary. To do this, stitch together, turn back the ends and 
fasten down neatly. Before cutting the braid, run a few stitches 
across to prevent widening and fraying. To form angles, catch 




Rose Doily. 



both edges of the braid to the pattern, fold to make a neat point, 
and fell in place ; and in turning rounds or ovals, press the braid on 
the pattern till the edges lie flat and easy. Remember that only 
those stitches which are to be removed are taken through the pattern ; 
all others are used to connect the braids. The work is wrong side 
up when in progress. When passing the thread from one part to 
another, run along the centre of braid, allowing the stitches to show 
as little as possible. After whipping a curve (by overcasting the 
inner edge of braid and drawing to required outline) fasten thread 



DESIGNS IN CROSS-STITCH. 91 

securely. Do not slight this part of the work, as much depends on 
careful following of the pattern outline. 

It makes little difference whether the "bars" or " fillings " are 
first made, though most lace-makers prefer the former ■ these repre- 
sent the groundwork, connecting the leaves, etc., of the pattern, and 
are of lighter character than the " filling " stitches, being of twisted 
or buttonhole bars, rings, wheels, etc., and similar open-work. A 
study of the beautiful pieces appearing in the Prize Needle-work 
Series will give a very clear idea of the different phases of this lace. 
When the work is finished and removed from the pattern, lay it, 
face down, on several thicknesses of flannel or other soft material, 
spread over it a damp cloth, and press with a hot iron. A very 
good way to give lace that slight stiffness which is desirable, and is 
so difficult to obtain by use of starch, is to use a piece of new, stiff 
organdie or similar muslin, wringing this lightly out of the water, 
spreading it over the lace, and over this another thin cloth. Then 
press with the iron, moving it rather slowly over the entire surface. 



DESIGNS IN CROSS-STITCH. 

[Contributed by Mrs. A. W. Stratton, Holliston, Mass.] 

Cross-stitch embroidery is very popular at present, and certainly 
seems one of the prettiest styles for decorating table scarfs, por- 
tieres, sofa pillows, and the thousand and one articles which render 
the home attractive. The patterns given are varied and all useful. 
They may be transferred to denim or similar material, or used on 
canvas with even checks. In the latter case, the stuff itself may 
be ravelled to form a fringe, mingled and tied with the Ulster rope 
linen floss. If linen, denim, or similar goods are used, I like a 
trimming of heavy lace, in " cross-stitch crochet," made of No. 30 
Barbour's Irish flax thread, with steel hook, size 1. 

Any cross-stitch pattern may be easily copied in crochet, thus : 
For the plain spaces, 1 tc, * chain 2, miss 2, 1 tc in next, repeat; 
for the blocks or crossed spaces, 1 tc,* tc in each of next 3 sts ; 
repeat. If preferred, the spaces maybe in " festoon st," thus : 1 tc, 



92 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



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Designs in Cross-stitch. 



* ch 3, miss 2, dc in next, ch 3, miss 2, tc in next; repeat. In 
next row, 1 tc, * ch 5, tc in next tc, repeat. The design for " Rabbit 
Tidy " may have one of four borders and corners shown. Finish 



DESIGNS IN CROSS-STITCH. 



93 




Designs in Cross-stitch. 



the bottom with fringe, top and sides with shell edge. No. 50, 
Barbour's Irish flax thread, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, with steel hook, 
size o, is best. Five spools will be sufficient for a tidy. 



94 barbour's prize needle-work series. 



EXPLANATION OF TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS USED 
IN BARBOUR'S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 

TERMS USED IN KNITTING. 

K, knit plain. 

O, over; thread over needle, forming an extra stitch. O 2, over 
twice. 

N, narrow ; knit two stitches together. 

P, purl (or seam) ; knit with thread before needle. 

SI, n, and b, slip, narrow, and bind ; slip first stitch, narrow next 
two, and draw slipped stitch over. 

SI and b, slip and bind ; same as si, n, and b, omitting the nar- 
rowing. To cast or bind off, continue the process. 

Stars and parentheses indicate repetition ; thus, * 02, n, repeat 
from * twice, and (o 2, n,) 3 times, mean the same as o 2,11,02, 
n, o 2, n. 

TERMS USED IN CROCHETING. 

Ch, chain ; a straight series of loops, each drawn with the hook 
through the one preceding it. 

Sc, single crochet ; hook through w T ork, thread over, and draw 
through work and stitch on hook at same time. 

Dc, double crochet ; hook through work, thread over, and draw 
through, over, and draw through two stitches on hook. 

Tc, treble crochet ; over, draw thread through work, over, draw 
through two stitches on hook, over, and draw through remaining 
two. 

Stc, short treble crochet ; like treble, save that the thread is 
drawn through the three stitches at once. 

Dtc, double treble crochet ; thread over twice before insertion of 
hook in work, then proceed as in treble crochet. 

P, picot ; a loop of chain joined by catching in first stitch of 
chain. 

Complete illustrated directions for these stitches are given in 
"No. 1 " of the Prize Series. 



Ask for 

Barbour's 



Established 
1784. 



It is the best for all uses. 
Insist upon having it. 
Sold everywhere. 

See that the threads you purchase bear labels similar to the following. 
THEY ARE STANDARD. 

3 -CORD 200 YARDS SPOOL THREAD. 

IN- 
DARK BLUE, for strong Sewing 

WHITE, ) For 

D. BROWN, \ LaceMaki 

(Ecru ) 




DRABS, 



and 
Needlework, 




TOP LABEL. 



REVERSE LABEL. 



BALL THREAD. 



COLORS. 

Grey, White & Ecru. 
\ Oz. Balls. 




SIZES. 

¥ 

Nos. \6 to 70. 
(No. 70 Fine Size.) 



LINEN FLOSSES 
In all the Art Shades. 



J& 


T7LSTEB 


SiZEOO 


fa 


ROPE LIKEN FLOSS. 


SHADE 


i-RAOE Aa*MARK 


The Barbour Brothers Co. 


N9 3 


md 


NEW YORK. 



BARBOUR'S STANDARD 
3-Cord Carpet Thread. 

©***&#***&**&*** & sHHS 
| BARBOURS' IRISH FLAX. % 



Size 00, " Rope," Medium, 

u 4, "Etching," Fine. 
White Flossette, 



IN ALL COLORS. 



* ** *** **** 



Fine to Coarse. 



Ask for 

Barbour's 



Established J784. 




Barbour's 

Irish Flax 

Threads 



Are made for every branch of trade, and for 



every purpose where Linen Threads are used. 

They are specially adapted and are standard and the best for all kinds 
of hand sewing and machine work. 



LINEN THREADS SPECIALLY MADE FOR 

Boot and Shoe Making, 
Clothing" Manufacturers, 
Carpet Sewing, 



Harness and Saddlery Making", ¥ 
Book Binding, 
Glove Making, 
Fish Nets, 



¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



For Strength and Durability 

BARBOUR'S 

IRISH LENTEN THREAD 

Is the best for all uses. 

Received Highest Awards at 
World's Fair, Chicago, i8gj. 

Special Merits, 
Distinguished Excellence* 
Uniformity, 
Strength, 
Adaptability, 
Durability, 



"*.<>»/*». /"s/* 



Barbour's Threads receive Highest Awards wherever exhibited. 

Spool, Ball, and Skein Threads 

IN 

ALL 

COLORS 

For all kinds of coarse, strong sewing, and fine stitching, and for every kind 
of Art Needlework with Linen. 

For sale by all wholesale dry goods jobbing houses, shoe findings and 
saddlery hardware dealers throughout the country. 

At retail by all small-ware dealers, general stores, carpet houses, and shoe 
findings dealers. Ask for 

BARBOUR'S 



c- 



r 



4 , Ulster Rope 

barbour s T . -, 

Linen rloss 



is continually and rapidly advancing in popularity as its perfect adaptability to the 
varied uses of expensive silks becomes more strongly attested. Its smoothness and 
lustre is unsurpassed. It is especially adapted for Embroidery, for the decoration 
of a thousand and one articles for home use and adornment, and with equally 
as charming effect can be applied as readily to the uses of Knotting, Netting, 
Knitting, Crocheting, and kindred arts. For Slippers, Mittens, Purses, etc., 
it is durable, lustrous, firm, and far less expensive than silk, and its sale in 
this new field is constantly increasing. 

75 shades are now on the market, including the Newest Art Shades, and 
the old favorites: others will be added as approved. 



¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ 

¥ ¥ 

J Ask J 

* your r 

t Dealer for Barbour's J 

¥ ¥ 

t Ulster Rope Linen Floss I 

¥ ¥ 

¥ ¥ 

¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ 



To "VC^lsh Make a light suds with Ivory or other pure soap, and 

"C f » j (particularly for the first laundering) cool water. Wash 

' one article at a time, finishing with this before taking 

another. Do not rub the embroider}', or put soap directly upon it. Rinse 

carefully and quickly in clear, cold water, to which a little salt may be added. 

After rinsing, place between two thick towels, or in one which may be folded 

over, roll up. squeeze (in order to extract the moisture), 

then unroll, place right side down on a soft cloth or flannel Art Embroidery 

folded in several thicknesses, lav a white cloth over the ""?? ** washed 

. ' - , , _ with great care 

wrong side, and press until dry with a moderately hot iron. 



STERLING & FRANCINE CLARK ART INSTITUTE 

NK9100 .B7 v.6 stack 

Bradford, Marv E./A treatise on lace-mak 



5587 



mi ii, in mil iim mum i 
.... p 



II 

mill 



Strong Linen S,..l^ 62 - 9973J: 

GIVES ^! | i iiiniijl|iiii ii!iiiiiii ;iiijl|iiiiiiiijl[iiiiiiiij![iiiiiiiijl['iiiiii^ 

Satisfactory fsEE^y ^Cl 

■n « 11 That all r/fflf\^rj 

Results 



■f| Your 

£1 Linen Thread 

1; carries this 

%<| Trade Mark. 



'^^ll■■ ,il,-, ■■|l■ ,,l ■■■■■|iH |,,, >ii|ii* ia| Miiiiii m «iiJiiiniMii 1 iiiiuMiigHiii -iiijiiiimiiiji^ 




¥¥¥¥¥*¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥*¥¥*¥¥¥¥¥¥**¥ 



¥ 
¥ 

¥ For Fine 
* Lace Making 



ler for 



¥ 
¥ 

■i 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 

umbers |J 

0-120-450-250 } 

¥ 
¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ 



, 200 Yds. 



,ope 
loss 



(Jolors-75 Shades 

and 

WHITE J^LOSSETTE 



£5 



vft 



x> 



THE BARBOUR BROTHERS COMPANY. 



NEW YORK, 218 CHURCH ST. 



Boston, 58 South St. Chicago, 108 & 110 Franklin St. 

Philadelphia, 410 Arch St. Cincinnati. 118 East 6th St, 

San Francisco, 517 & 519 Market St. St. Louis, 814 Lucas Ave.